Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Nursing & Healthcare Chicago, USA.

Day 1 :

  • Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing
Location: Versailles - C

Session Introduction

Heather Mac Donald

University of New Brunswick, Canada

Title: Battling adversity: Women’s journey back to work after a lapse due to depression

Time : 10:30-10:50

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Depression is both an urgent and complex occupational health issue. Many individuals are employed at the same time as they are experiencing a major depressive episode. A large proportion of workers who experience a depression-related absence from work are women. However, little is known about the experiences of returning to work for women with depression. The goal of this study is to identify women’s experiences of returning to work after a lapse due to a depression. Grounded Theory is the method being used. At this time 31 women of the projected 40 have participated in in-depth interviews. Analysis is currently being conducted and reoccurring themes are emerging. In this presentation the focus will be on two themes. The first theme is "Battling Adversity" which includes battling depression, battling the workplace and battling the institution, all of which describe the struggle many women have experienced in returning to work. The second theme “Upholding Silence” includes concealing their depression and selective disclosure. Women speak about wearing a mask when they are in the workplace in order to conceal their depression. Many women mention triggers and use particular language while explaining their absence from work, such as burnout, stress, and fatigue. These words are thought to be helpful in concealing the depression. Women described their journey back to work and back to wellness.

Speaker
Biography:

Anahid Kulwicki earned her BSN at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon and MSN and doctoral degrees from Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis. Her program of research focuses on the health of immigrant, refugee and minority populations in the areas of domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, infant mortality, teen health, maternal child health, smoking and cancer prevention.

Abstract:

Haiti suffered a 7.0 - magnitude earthquake on January 12, 2010. More than 200,000 people were killed, with countless more injured and displaced. Due to injury, many Haitian had to undergo amputations of a limb or limbs. Exposure to the devastating effects of such massive earthquake and witnessing large numbers of dead and injured is traumatizing to humans and is known to be predictive of psychological disorders. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after having undergone amputation of a lower extremity, as a result of the earthquake. A convenience sample of Haitian participants (N = 140) was interviewed. The PCL-C (PTSD Checklist Civilian version) in Creole was used to measure PTSD. Findings from the study indicated a substantial percentage of the participants suffer from PTSD (34.3%). Women experiencing PTSD were slightly higher than men (women 38.9%, men 29.4%). An effort in providing mental health and social services to adults with amputations is of utmost importance in addition to their physical needs related to amputated limb or limbs. A comprehensive program for integrating survivors of the Haitian earthquake in society is of vital importance including screening for vulnerable populations should be a national

Speaker
Biography:

Julie Hall is the Executive Director with responsibility for high secure provision at Rampton Hospital; medium secure units at Arnold Lodge in Leicester and Wathwood Hospital in Rotherham, the Low Secure and Community Forensic Directorate and Offender Health in the East Midlands and Yorkshire. Julie began her career as a Registered Mental Nurse, and has since worked as a clinician, senior manager and director within mental health services in the East Midlands. Between these appointments Julie spent time as a full time lecturer in Nursing at the University of Nottingham, before returning to the NHS. Julie’s role prior to taking up this position is of Director of Nursing and Operations at Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. Julie has made a number of professional contributions and gained accolades including holding the title of Queen’s Nurse, being a Senior Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Fellow at the University of Lincoln, and appointment to the East Midlands’ Clinical Senate. Julie is professionally known particularly for her research into the use of care pathways in mental health, service redesign, quality improvement and governance.

Abstract:

The purpose of this review was to consider the influence of statutory mental health provision upon the use of high, medium and low secure psychiatric services. The brief for this review posed the ultimate question: ‘which, if any available statutory mental health services correlate with a lower use of secure services in region?’ The overall profile of the secure services used in the region shows a decline in high secure services and a growth in low secure. However, it has only been in high secure services where the rate of discharge exceeds the rate of admission. Therefore assuming that there is little or no intention to increase capacity in low and medium secure services an increased rate of discharge would be required. A particular area to consider is the numbers accessing low secure services from local services and the functioning of intensive care and step down services enabling discharge from low secure services. In financial terms one PCT is a low outlier for its spend on secure and high dependency services and this same PCT is a high outlier in its spend on PD services. On considering relationships between wider mental health provision and secure service use it was found that PCTs in the region that spend more on Assertive Outreach used less low secure occupied bed days and spent less overall on secure and high dependency services.

Michiko Tanaka

Kyushu University, Japan

Title: Effect of educational degrees on nursing profession in Japan

Time : 11:30-11:50

Speaker
Biography:

Tanaka has completed her BSN and MSN from California State University, Fullerton and her Ph.D. from Department of Health Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Japan. She has currently worked as an assistant Professor, R&D Laboratory for Innovative Biotherapeutics Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University. Her research areas are nursing administration, nursing professionalism, evidenced-based practice, gene therapy for peripheral artery disease, and translational research.

Abstract:

Educational degrees strongly impact professional development. In Japan, no studies have examined the relationship between educational degrees and nursing professionalism. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of educational degrees on nursing professionalism among Japanese nurses. Wheel of Professionalism in Nursing Model was applied as a theoretical framework and the corresponding inventory, Behavioral Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing, was used to measure the relationship between education and level of professionalism. A total of 2,972 surveys were distributed and 1,846 respondents returned surveys from 25 hospitals in the random sample in Japan. The results revealed that nursing professionalism was related significantly to higher educational preparation (F=154.47, p<.0001) by a one-way ANOVA, and the Tukey–Kramer multiple comparison test revealed that graduate degree was significantly associated with high scores of professionalism (p<.0001). The correlation and regression analyses also showed a moderate to strong relationship between education preparation and nursing professionalism (r=0.20, p<.0001; β=0.52, p<.0001). The results confirm that higher level of educational preparation, especially graduate degree, is associated with higher nursing professionalism. Awareness of important professional factors is essential to continually maintain nursing professionalism.

Louise Tourigny

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, USA

Title: Occupational mental health among nurses: A global framework

Time : 11:50-12:10

Speaker
Biography:

Louise Tourigny (Ph.D., Concordia University, Canada) is Professor in the Management Department at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Her work has been published in several journals including the International Journal of Human Resource Management, Cross-cultural Management: An International Journal, the International Journal of Cross-cultural Management, and Canadian Psychology among others. She presented her work at several international conferences including the European Congress of Psychology, the European Academy of Occupational and Health Psychology, Work, Stress, and Health and the Academy of Management where she received the Best International Paper Award from the Health Care Management Division in 2009.

Abstract:

A comprehensive global framework of occupational mental health among nurses is presented. Grounded in more than 15 years of research in the field this framework has provided extensive conceptual background for applied research in several countries including Argentina, China, Japan, India, Turkey, the Caribbean, and Kazakhstan among others. The concepts of job stress, burnout, and work-related depression are embedded in a nomological network of antecedents, moderators, mediators, and attitudinal, psychological and behavioral outcomes of relevance to nurses, human resources managers, and hospital administrators across the globe. Job performance, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), absenteeism, presenteeism, turnover intention, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job involvement figure among the behavioral and attitudinal outcomes studied. The presentation focuses on applied research presented and published by the author from 1998 to 2014. An integration of the empirical findings corroborated across countries is presented. Cross-cultural differences are highlighted. Implications for practice and research are presented. Finally, difficulties in obtaining reliable data across different cultural settings are discussed.

Andrea Sonenberg

Pace university, USA

Title: Population-Based primary health care course

Time : 12:10-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Andrea Sonenberg, PhD, WHNP, CNM-BC completed her BS from Cornell University, BSN from Syracuse University, MS in Midwifery for Georgetown University, and Ph.D from Columbia University. She practiced as a Certified Nurse-Midwife and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner for over 20 years. Currently, Dr. Sonenberg is Associate Professor of Nursing in the Department of Graduate Studies at Pace University, College of Health Professions. Her area of research is regulatory policy of advanced practice registered nurses and its association with access to care and population health outcomes. Dr. Sonenberg has published book chapters, as well as papers in peer-reviewed journals and international electronic annals. She has presented her research in nursing and policy venues both domestically and internationally.

Abstract:

Stakeholders globally and nationally, from the World health Organization to the Institute of Medicine and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, have recently stressed the importance of population-based care and public health as drivers for health system reform. It is essential for providers to look beyond their silos, and to practice in an integrated, comprehensive way. Heeding these recommendations nurse educators recognize the need to revise curricula to present the essential elements of primary health care, under which primary care and public health providers can collectively work. Framing practice through the lens of primary health care is one way to achieve the goal of a more collaborative approach to improving population health. The purpose of this paper is to share the journey of a school of nursing as it re-committed itself to the vision of primary health care and revised curriculum to strengthen content to ensure integration of public health and population-based care throughout the courses. This manuscript presents the result of this work, the development of one of the XXX graduate core courses entitled Advanced Nursing in Primary Health Care.

Break:
Lunch Break 12:30-13:10 @ Monaco
  • Cancer Nursing
Location: Versailles - C

Session Introduction

Liselotte Jakobsson

Kristianstad University, Sweden

Title: Does a salutogenic attitude increase life quality after prostate cancer treatment?

Time : 13:30-13:50

Speaker
Biography:

Liselotte Jakobsson, RNT, DMsc, has received her Doctoral in Medical Science in 2000 from Lund University. She is senior lecturer at ground and advanced level and a researcher at Kristianstad University, Sweden. Her main research interest is in prostate cancer and its consequences for life quality. Current research also involves frequent ER-visitors and the implementation of a new model of care delivery at ER. She is a member of the Educational Board for the Section of Health and Society and The Research and Development Committee at the Central Hospital of Kristianstad. Her publications concerns both qualitative and quantitative research.

Abstract:

A high sense of coherence is suggested to be a predominate for how life is managed and is often used as an assessment tool for general health status after treatment or connected to health perception in general. A low SOC is found to be related to poor perceived health, low social support and low emotional support thus building on life already strained by cancer illness and treatment. The study investigated the influence of sense of coherence, SOC, on and, its correlation to life quality and sexual functioning in men after prostate cancer treatment. The underlying assumption being that a salutogenic attitude may make life seem more meaningful, comprehensive and manageable. The 5-year longitudinal study including 6 data collection points, baseline, 3 moths, 1, 2, 3 and 5 years. Data was collected with the Sense of Coherence questionnaire (short form) and the generic Quality of life questionnaire, EORTC QLQ C-30, together with the prostate cancer specific module PR-25. Preliminary results showed a stable SOC-rating over the years contradicting results from studies where this is not found. Positive influence from SOC-ratings was found on quality of life, physical as well as psychosocial aspects of life immediately after surgery. After 5 years SOC correlated to emotional and cognitive functioning and to longtime side effects from treatment. It is reasonable to argue that SOC thus contributed to meaning, comprehensiveness and manageability in life in different ways according to patients needs during a post-surgery range of years.

Speaker
Biography:

Shulamith Kreitler is a professor of psychology at Tel Aviv University and head of the Psychooncology Research Center at the Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, in Israel. She is a certified clinical psychologist and health psychologist. He maor research is focused on psychological rrisk factors of different physical and mental disorder, quality of life and coping. She has taught at the Nursing Department in hospials an at the University of Haifa. She has published about 200 research papers and 10 books.

Abstract:

The talk deals with three major issues which we have found to be significant and bothersome for cancer patients and their family members in the framework of critical nursing. The three issues refer to the place of dying (e.g., home, hospital, nursing home), the time (e.g., the phase of the disease and degree of suffering) and the manner of dying (e.g., under one's control or not). The involved issues have been studied in studies with patients and their family members. In one study medical and demographic variables were examined as predictors of the place of dying, compared to the patient's preference. Another study examined the impact of nutritional state and mobility on the patient's quality of life and desire to live. The relations between pain and desire to live have also been examined. A separate study was devoted to the impact of support systems (by family and nursing staff) and of beliefs on the survival of patients in critical care.

Speaker
Biography:

Amany Mohamed Shebl has completed his PhD from Cairo University, Egypt. She occupied several positions as (head of medical, surgical nursing department, vice dean for student affair, and vice dean for post graduate and high studies research affair). And now she is occupying position Dean of faculty of nursing, Mansoura University, Egypt. She has several papers in reputed journals. She is also act as reviewer of international cancer journal and she is very interested in scientific research.

Abstract:

Introduction and aim: Gastrointestinal side effects are the most frequently reported adverse effects of antineoplastic and significantly affect patients’ daily functioning, quality of life, and compliance with therapy. Therefore, the aim of the study was to implement nursing management protocol to radiotherapy induced GIT side effects patients with cancer.
Research design and setting: A quasi-experimental research design was conducted in the Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine Department at Mansoura University Main Hospital.
Sample: The data were collected from two hundred adult patients of both males and females randomly selected to correspond to the inclusion criteria and divided into two groups.
Tools: For the collection of the data and achieving the aim of the study, threetools were utilized by the researchers. A structured Interview questionnaire, a nausea and vomiting assessment scale, and a diarrhea assessment scale.
Results: Results indicated an increase in the total knowledge score for patients immediately after protocol. Implementation compared with after protocol implementation. A decreased incidence and severity of GIT side effects at post and follow up tests was found.
Conclusion: The implementation of nursing management protocol has a positive effect on the studied patients' total knowledge scores and decrease incidence and severity of GIT side effects in the study group.
Recommendations: it was recommended that, nursing management protocol should be integrated within the plan of care for cancer patients going to radiotherapy.

Biography:

Nancy Innocentia Ebu has completed her Masters degree in Public Health from Northumbria University in Newcastle upon-Tyne, United Kingdom, and currently pursuing doctoral studies at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. She is a commonwealth scholar and a member of faculty at the School of Nursing, University of Cape Coast. She is also the faculty registration officer and an assistant coordinator of foreign programs for the School of Nursing. Her research interests are cervical cancer and maternal health. She has made podium presentations in several international conferences and has papers undergoing peer review in international journals.

Abstract:

Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide and contributes to high mortality rate among women. This study aimed at assessing the knowledge and practice of cervical cancer screening among female nurses at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana.
Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 264 randomly selected female professional nurses aged 21 to 60 was conducted using structured questionnaire. The study was approved by the Committee on Human Research, Publications and Ethics (CHRPE) of School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Associations between the sociodemographic factors and cervical cancer screening were tested with chi-square at p<0.05 and categorical variables were presented in frequency and standard deviation.
Results: The study revealed that 112 (42%) out of the 264 nurses had ever been screened for cervical cancer. Eighty out of the (112) nurses already screened had no interest in screening again in future. Age significantly associated with cervical screening (P=0.03). Of those who had never been screened 152 (58%), lack of awareness about the disease was a barrier to screening. Sexual intercourse was the main risk marker for cervical cancer transmission n= 208 (78.7%).
Conclusion: The high educational background of the participants did not seem to increase the likelihood of cervical screening. Promotion of cervical screening among nurses will impact the health of women as they educate and encourage other women to access preventive health services.

Speaker
Biography:

Anastasia Dean completed her medical degree and post-graduate study at the University of Melbourne, Australia. She is currently working with Western Health in the Department of Surgery. Her research into breast cancer management is mentored by Prof Bruce Mann and Ms Meron Pitcher, respective heads of the Breast Surgery Unit at Royal Melbourne Hospital and Western Health.

Abstract:

Purpose: Breast cancer survivors are at risk of specific physical and psycho-social issues, such as arm swelling, fatigue and depression. Firstly, we investigate the symptoms reported by Australia breast cancer survivors upon completion of definitive treatment. Secondly, we evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of a multi-centre pilot program nurse-led clinic to identify these issues and make timely referrals to available services.
Methods: Patients post-definitive treatment (excluding ongoing hormonal therapy) for early breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were invited to participate. An hour long appointment with a breast care nurse (BCN) was scheduled. In preparation, patients completed validated quality-of-life surveys (FACT-B, Menopause Rating Scale and Distress Thermometer). During the appointment, issues identified in the surveys were addressed and referrals to appropriate services arranged.
Results: 183 of 274 (67%) eligible patients attended a nurse-led clinic. Mean age 56.8 years (range 29-87 years), 181/183 women, 105/183 post-menopausal. 96 (55%) participants reported significant level of distress; 31 (18%) participants reported extreme distress or depression. Distress stemmed from a lack of energy (56/175); poor quality of sleep (50/176); inability to work or participate in household activities (35/172) and problems with sex life (28/89). 166 referrals were offered; 94% of patients accepted the referrals. 65% responded to a follow-up survey: the majority of women either strongly agreed or agreed that the BCN was overwhelmingly supportive, helpful in making referrals, and compassionate towards them. 39% reported making lifestyle changes as a result of the BCN.
Conclusion: Breast cancer survivors experience a unique set of challenges, including low mood, difficulty sleeping, problems with sex life and fear of disease recurrence. The nurse-led clinic model is an appropriate and effective method to ensure physical and psycho-social issues are identified and managed in a timely manner. This model also empowers breast cancer survivors with information about their diagnosis and available services.

  • Clinical Nursing
Location: Versailles - C

Session Introduction

Mary A. Maryland

University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

Title: Advancing clinical nursing excellence in Rwanda; A management perspective

Time : 15:10-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Mary A Maryland completed her PhD at the University of Illinois at Chicago in nursing sciences and public health. She has worked with Aurelie Nkomeje, MSN nursing administration, Howard University, Durbin, South Africa.

Abstract:

Nursing care delivery that provides for excellent patient outcomes is a common expectation of patients and nurse administrators. Nurse employers demand and support clinical proficiency for nurses. The latest research and evidence based protocols are often just a mouse click away. These statements typically apply to nursing practice in the United States. However, resource poor countries, with the same needs for excellent nursing care delivery for their citizens, have challenges to meet the most basic nursing care requirements. The Rwanda Human Resources for Health (HRH) program is a partnership between the Rwanda Ministry of Health, the Clinton Health Access Initiative and a US Academic Consortium of medical and nursing schools. The goal of strengthening nursing and midwifery education, faculty development, and professionalism of Rwandan nursing, is achieved by having nurse faculty from US Academic Consortium Schools work directly with Rwandan nurse administrators, educators and clinicians in increments of at least one year. The conclusion of year two, of the seven year program, is demonstrating the effectiveness of nurse to nurse collaborations to improve clinical excellence in patient care delivery. Improvements have been achieved in patient outcomes and continuous professional development programs for nurses. Evaluation is ongoing and clinical nursing education changes are promising.

Biography:

Mary Elizabeth Greenberg, PhD, RN-BC, C-TNP is a recognized expert in telephone nursing with over 20 year experience in telephone triage, including research, practice, and program management. She has many publications and presentations. She co-authored, with Carol Rutenberg, The art and science of telephone triage: How to practice nursing over the phone (2012) and a chapter, Telephone triage: A primer for lawyers and LNCs, in Nursing Malpractice (2011).

Abstract:

The telephone is a commonly used tool in healthcare. Nurses use the telephone to triage patients, discuss test results, coordinate care, follow-up after a procedure or hospital discharge, and much more. The telephone offers such a convenient way to deliver care that both the complexity of this practice and the inherent risks are easy to overlook. Indeed, patient care over the telephone is among the most sophisticated and high risk practices nurses engage in today. If you interact with patients over the telephone this session is for you. In the presentation, the role of the nurse, identify the basic standards used to guide the practice, explore lawsuits and common pitfalls to highlight the risks associated with this practice, and discuss strategies to reduce the risks and enhance the safety and quality of care provided over the telephone etc. will be reviewed.

Break:
Coffee Break 15:50-16:10 @ Versailles Foyer

Shannan Hamlin

Houston Methodist Hospital, USA

Title: Nurse-driven delirium care optimizes outcomes in the hospitalized elderly

Time : 16:10-16:30

Speaker
Biography:

Shannan Hamlin is the Program Director for Nursing Research and EBP at Houston Methodist Hospital. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from Houston Baptist University, her Master of Science degree with a specialization in Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and her PhD at the University of Texas Health Science Center Houston. She is certified by the American Nurses Credentialing Center as an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Dr. Hamlin has received over $236,000 in funding and published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals. She is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences.

Abstract:

Delirium is an acute decline in cognitive functioning which may result from multiple factors such as side effects of medication, dehydration, acute illness or infection, or an acute neurologic event. As an independent predictor of poor outcomes, delirium is associated with increased risks in mortality dementia, institutionalization, increased length of stay, and higher healthcare costs. Delirium is the most frequent complication affecting as much as 50% of hospitalized elderly, at a cost of more than $164 Billion per year in the United States. However, up to 40% of delirium cases can be classified as a preventable complication. Delirium in the hospitalized elderly patient is a significant public health issue as it ranks in the top three conditions in need of quality care improvement for the elderly. In fact, delirium in the elderly is a quality of care and patient safety marker. Although delirium prevention remains the most effective strategy to improve outcomes, routine assessment of cognition can greatly improve early delirium recognition, leading to faster and more effective interventions. Recognition is best accomplished by a brief cognitive screening and astute clinical observation. Patient orientation is insufficient to adequately screen patients for delirium. With the bedside nurse as the driver, we implemented a multitude of innovative strategies to proactively identify at-risk patients and then initiate prompt interventions for optimized patient outcomes. Initiatives include creative educational strategies, professional advancement options, interprofessional communication tools, technology enhancements, evidence-based interventions, and patient-centric safety protocols. By leading the initiative to bring innovation and evidence-based practice to the bedside, we are demonstrating the impact of nursing and exemplifying the Institute of Medicine’s directive for nurses to practice to the full extent of their training and to act as a "critical factor in determining the quality of care in hospitals and the nature of patient outcomes”(p. 92). As leaders and drivers of change in the health care environment, nurses can and do achieve optimal outcomes because we are well positioned "on the front lines" to promptly recognize alarming signs and to respond quickly and effectively in various situations. Delirium in the older adult is one such scenario. As direct results of our nurse-driven Delirium Initiative we have demonstrated a reduction in falls, high-risk delirium medications, and an increased number of at-risk patients are being discharged home. Because of nursing’s unwavering commitment to excellence, we have achieved what others have been unable to do. We are transforming nursing practice by leveraging our knowledge and skills to create a culture of quality care. As we exemplifying the power of collective nursing in achieving quality care, our success should be viewed as an example to other healthcare facilities to emulate both nationally and internationally as a model of excellence. Nurses can and should be leading the charge to redesign and improve healthcare for all patients across all practice settings.

Elenor Kaminsky

Dep. of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden

Title: Telephone Nursing Stakeholder views and understandings from a paediatric and a gender perspective

Time : 16:30-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Elenor Kaminsky, PhD, RN-BC (pediatrics, district nursing and medical science), has clinical experience from most areas of Swedish pediatric inpatient childcare, school nursing and telephone nursing. The latter a Pediatric Emergency Department, the Swedish National Pharmacy Line and The Swedish National Helpline for Women subjected to threats and violence. She completed her thesis on Telephone Nursing within Swedish healthcare direct in 2013, including four publications, and has held several international conference presentations during her PhD studies. She co-authored, with Inger Holmström and Urban Rosenqvist, a chapter, Telephone nurses can understand their work in different ways, in Telephone advice within healthcare (2008 in Swedish). At the moment, Elenor Kaminsky works in a research project focusing on increased awareness of equity in health, in an intervention study designed for telephone nurses. She also teaches communication and telephone nursing at the Nursing Program at Uppsala University, Sweden.

Abstract:

Objective: To describe telephone nursing in from telenurse, parent caller and operation manager viewpoints.
Methods: Four empirical data collections, where of three qualitative interview studies, were conducted. Data were analysed with phenomenographic approach, content analysis and statistical analysis.
Results: Telenursing work can by telenurses be understood in a variety of ways. Authentic pediatric calls between parents and telenurses revealed 73% mother callers concerning newborn to teenage children. Ear, skin problems, and fever were common complaints and call median 4.4 minutes. Call outcome for referral/self-care was 48/52%, with a likelihood of receiving a referral almost twice as high for fathers compared with mothers. Parent's degree of worry and trust influenced whether to contact SHD or not. Calls were carefully prepared and the caller often depended upon family routine. Most parents followed recommendations, some to such extent that they, despite a continuously strong worry, reported not to seek healthcare without a telenurse recommendation. Operation managers mainly reported organizational goals as goals of telenursing work. Equitable healthcare was regarded important, while health promotion was not.
Conclusions: The studied viewpoints of telephone nursing calls for clarification regarding goals of telephone nursing work and the goals related to healthcare obligations. The studied viewpoints can all contribute to a telenurse work description. Lack of time as a barrier to health promotion should be looked upon critically since it might be counterproductive to the goal of saving healthcare resources elsewhere. Telenurses need to be aware of their valuable role and increase parents’ consciousness of holding the ultimate responsibility for their child’s condition.

Biography:

Imran Khalid is a Staff Physician at John D Dingell VA Medical Center in Detroit, USA and a Consultant Intensivist at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Jeddah. He is Board Certified by American Board of Internal Medicine in Internal medicine, Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine. He is interested in clinical research and has published more than 20 papers and numerous abstracts in peer reviewed journals. He also serves on the editorial boards of six peer reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Background: Cancer patients with sepsis have high mortality. However, there is limited data regarding outcome of septic ward patients who are admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with and without Medical Emergency Team (MET) intervention. We evaluated this question in our study.
Methods: MET in our hospital includes a critical care nurse, a physician and a respiratory therapist. We evaluated 4852 oncology ward patients from January 2009 to July 2011. 139 patients were included in analysis who were admitted to the ICU and divided into MET transfers (admitted to ICU after MET involvement) and Non-MET transfers. Primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Data was analyzed using t-test and Pearson chi-square test, as appropriate.
Results: Out of 139 ICU transfers, 91 were MET transfers and 48 were non-MET transfers. The MET and Non-MET patients had similar APACHE II scores (22.1 vs. 23.4;p=0.07). However, MET transfers as compared to Non-MET transfers had lower rates of intubation (47% vs. 66%;p=0.03), lower ICU mortality (41% vs. 62%;p=0.02), and lower 28-day mortality (43% vs. 65%;p=0.01). Among the non-MET patients, 84% fulfilled the Hospital MET activation and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria up to six hours prior to ICU admission. Non-MET transfers had delayed initiation of resuscitation, transfer to ICU and normalization of lactic acid (p<0.04).
Conclusion: Septic cancer patients on the wards have better outcome if MET is activated in time. Most of these patients exhibit SIRS criteria which should prompt immediate MET activation. MET improves outcome in these patients through early management with the help of critical care nurses and prompt ICU transfer.

Speaker
Biography:

Shangping Zhao is studying for her nursing master degree, at the age of 25 years from Sichuan University.

Abstract:

Purpose: To investigate the incidence and influencing factors of functional disability in Chinese patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).
Method: Six hundred and seven patients with RA were enrolled in the cross-sectional survey. Demographic data, social support, pain, fatigue and functional disability were obtained and analyzed.
Results: The average score of functional disability was 0.67, and 58.5% of patients had functional disability. Mild, moderate and severe of functional disability was 42.7%, 7.1% and 8.7%, respectively. Patients from rural residents, with lower income level and education had significant relationship with worse functional disability. Age, disease duration, hospitalized times, total cost for treatment, social support, pain and fatigue were strongly correlated with functional disability. Multivariate regression showed that pain, age, disease duration, total cost for treatment and hospitalized times was negative influencing factors; subjective and available social support was the protective predictors.
Conclusion: Functional disability is a common symptom though mild degree in our study. Healthcare policy and health professionals should pay more attention on patients with RA who live in rural residence, have a low level of income and education and long disease duration. Intervention and care such as treatment and health education should be provided as early as possible to keep the stability of RA. Pain management with a sound social support system may be effective intervention to postpone the progress of functional disability. Further researches should be done to evaluate the effect of these interventions on functional disability of RA.

Biography:

Ndou Nthomeni Dorah has submitted her Ph.D thesis for examination in April 2014 at the age of 53 years from Venda University Limpopo province South Africa. She is a lecturer of Advanced Nursing science, facilitating diploma in general nursing science and degree in nursing education. She has supervised five research students at Masters degree. She has presented two papers at international conferences and two nationally. She has published six papers in various accredited journals nationally and internationally.

Abstract:

The AIDS epidemic is a global crisis, and constitutes one of the most serious challenges to development and social progress in Southern Africa. The AIDS epidemic is eroding decades of development gains, undermining economies, threatening security and destabilizing society. Professional nurses providing care to patients diagnosed with AIDS related illnesses are identified as a risk group in terms of contracting HIV. They sometimes feel stressed when carrying out their basic tasks of promoting, preventing and maintaining the health of individuals, families and the public. The purpose of the study was to develop a model for supporting professional nurses caring for patients with AIDS related illnesses at Steve Biko hospital, Tshwane district in Gauteng province. Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative research designs were used to explore the challenges and support experienced by professional nurses when caring for patients who are admitted at the hospital with AIDS related illnesses. Triangulation design was further used to determine the support provided by the nurse managers to the professional nurses caring for patients diagnosed with AIDS related illnesses. The population consist of all professional nurses and nurse managers working at Steve Biko academic hospital caring for patients diagnosed with AIDS related illnesses. Ethical considerations were ensured throughout the research. A non-probability sampling method was used to determine the sample of the study. The sample size of those who were interviewed was determined by data saturation. In-depth individual interviews were conducted using semi-structured interview guide. A checklist was used to collect quantitative data from the nurses’ personnel records. Records of professional nurses who gave consent to participate in this study, allocated in the units where patients diagnosed with AIDS related illnesses are admitted, were checked for and leave patterns and absenteeism patterns in order to find out if caring for these patients has got an impact on the daily staff turnover. Trustworthiness, reliability and validity were ensured. Qualitatively, data was analysed by using open coding method. Quantitatively, leave and absenteeism patterns depicted on the checklist were analysed using graphs and Pie charts to complement qualitative research findings. The major concept "effective support" was identified, followed by model development for supporting professional nurses.

Jet Jet K Dongui-Is

Saint Louis University, Philippines

Title: Learning and teaching styles of student nurses
Speaker
Biography:

Jet Jet K. Dongui-is finished her 3rd year in Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Saint Louis University, Baguio City, Philippines. She is one of the 12 authors of the research entitled Learning and Teaching Styles of Student Nurses as part of their requirement in completing their curriculum.

Abstract:

Background: Amidst numerous studies conducted on learning styles of students from a variety of courses, levels and school, a recent study recommended a great need for research on learning styles of student nurses. Moreover, related literatures have not been found exploring both the learning and teaching style of student nurses. Aims: The study aimed to determine the learning and teaching styles of student nurses and if there is an association between them. It also intended to discover whether student nurses are unimodal or multimodal in their styles and identified which faculty teaching style affords maximum outcome for student’s learning styles. Methods; Quantitative Descriptive-Correlational design was used. Participants were randomly selected 312 student nurses at School of Nursing X, Baguio City, Philippines. The questionnaire utilized a modified version of an adopted tool from Fleming’s VARK learning style version 7.2 (Visual, Auditory, Reader/Writer, Kinaesthetic) and Grasha’s teaching styles (Formal Authority, Demonstrator, Facilitator, Delegator). SPSS 19 was used for statistical treatment of data, where Chi square was used for the correlation of unimodal learning and teaching styles. Results/Finding: Majority of student nurses’ learning style is Kinesthetic and their teaching style is Demonstrator, which was also found to be significantly associated. Moreover, 8 out of 10 students are Unimodal in their learning and teaching modalities. In general, their preferred faculty teaching style is similar to their teaching style, which supports the concept, that teachers teach the way they learn. Conclusion: Study concludes that student nurses’ learning styles and teaching styles are varied, which exemplifies the uniqueness of every learner.This diversity in styles provided more evidence that a variety of mode of teaching and learning should be used by faculty and students to increase learning outcome and academic achievement. Recommendation: Future studies could be carried out in various schools of nursing utilizing faculty as respondents. Conduct assessment of learning style at the onset of classes/clinical placements so that faculty will become aware of the diversity of learners leading them to deliver diverse teaching methods.

Speaker
Biography:

Philip Onuoha has served in many capacities including Programme Director of Health Sciences Degree Programme, and Head of School of Allied Health and Nursing. He completed his PhD in 2003. His research areas are in but not limited to Continuing professional education of health staff and chronic disease management. He supervised and continues to supervise a number of graduate students in Nursing and Health Education and has published in many reputable peer-reviewed journals. He is currently the Acting Director, University of the West Indies School of Nursing, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago.

Abstract:

Background: Breast cancer is a leading cause of death both in the less and more developed countries. Early detection of breast cancer has been shown to significantly reduce mortality rates, yet many women fail to receive screening. Primary health care nurses are uniquely positioned to role model screening behaviours, educate clients on performance of breast self-examination and perform other screening activities. During the period 2007-2011 one hundred and ten (110) new cases of breast cancer were identified here in St. Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG). Of this, females constituted 106 (96.3%), while a minute number of men (4 = 3.7%) were diagnosed within this time frame (HIU, 2012 & 2013). Purpose: To determine the knowledge, self-efficacy and breast cancer screening practices of Primary Health Care Nurses (PHCNs) in SVG. The effects of interpersonal and situational influences on PHCNs’ participation in breast screening activities were also examined. Methods: This study utilized a non-experimental, descriptive survey design. Quota proportionate sampling was used to select 62 PHC Nurses working in the 9 health districts of SVG. The instrument consisted of researchers’-developed questionnaire consisting primarily of objective-type items which assessed knowledge of breast cancer, self-efficacy and breast cancer screening practices. Microsoft Excel 2007 and IBM PASW (SPSS) Version 22 were used to determine and confirm the results of this study. Findings: With 62 of the targeted 70 nurses responding, PHC nurses had poor knowledge of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between levels of awareness of breast cancer and respondents’ age, experience or professional qualification. Implications for practice: Continuous education and training are required to increase nurses’ levels of awareness of breast cancer. Organizational support and policies are essential in ensuring consistency and standardization of breast cancer screening practices. Replication of this study will validate initial findings and provide greater insight into the phenomenon.

Break:
18:30-19:30 Cocktails sponsored by Journal of Nursing & Care @ Versailles Foyer