Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Nursing & Healthcare Chicago, USA.

Day 2 :

  • Critical Care Nursing
    Track 5 Cardiac Nursing
Location: Versailles - C
Speaker

Chair

Ann-Marie Brown

The University of Akron
USA

Co-Chair

Praneed Songwathana

Prince of Songkla University Hatyai
Thailand

Session Introduction

Ann-Marie Brown

The University of Akron, USA

Title: Does in with the good equal out with the bad? Application of nutrition support research

Time : 09:40-10:00

Speaker
Biography:

Ann-Marie Brown is completing her PhD in Aug 2014 and has been a PICU Acute Care Pediatric NP for > 10 years. She has published numerous papers on nutrition in critically ill children, reducing codes outside the ICU, development of pediatric ICU NP programs, and VTE in the PICU. She is a Fellow in the American College of Critical Care Medicine. She has presented nationally and internationally on a variety of topics, including change in the acute care environment, nutrition, shock, and many others.

Abstract:

More than 30% of children admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) are malnourished and at risk to develop new or worsened malnutrition during their hospitalization. Nutrition support during critical illness is essential to diminish alterations in metabolism, support immune function, promote tissue repair, prevent loss of lean muscle mass and minimize weight loss. The extent of energy and protein deficiency that occurs during critical illness is multifactorial and includes age, baseline nutritional status and severity of the presenting condition. Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility during critical illness increases the risk of feeding intolerance due to increased influence of the Sympathetic Nervous System. In addition, many common PICU therapies may also slow GI motility, such as immobility and commonly administered medications, such as opiates and catecholamines. Thus the child is predisposed to feeding intolerance at a time when enteral nutrition (EN) is needed to avoid worsening malnutrition and decrease morbidities. Evidence suggests early and adequate delivery of EN in the appropriate ratio of calories, protein and fluids in the face of critical illness can reduce mortality, hospital acquired infections, ventilator days and skin breakdown. However, numerous barriers exist to the effective and efficient delivery of formulaic nutrition goals, resulting in a cumulative energy and protein deficit. These barriers include hemodynamic instability, presumed feeding intolerance, frequent feeding interruptions and variation in feeding practices. Current best practices to overcome barriers and optimize nutrition delivery in the critically ill infant and child will be presented.

Susan Dirkes

University of Michigan Health System, USA

Title: Acute kidney injury: Critical impact and nursing advocacy

Time : 10:00-10:20

Speaker
Biography:

Susan Dirkes is a staff nurse at the University of Michigan Health System on a medical-surgical progressive care unit and in the Surgical Intensive Care unit. Prior to that, she was an educator in the Surgical ICU at the University of Michigan for 25 years. She is extensively experienced in acute kidney injury, ARDS, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and critical care. She also worked for a 5 years at the Corporate level with renal companies such as Baxter Inc. and NxStage Medical Inc. She has published extensively on dialysis and critical care topic such as positioning in ARDS, and is internationally known in the field of dialysis and continuous renal replacement therapy. She received her undergraduate degree from Mercy College of Detroit and her Master’s degree from Madonna University in Michigan. She is President of Nursing Resources LLC also.

Abstract:

This presentation will focus on acute kidney injury (AKI), and why our role as critical care nurses can impact outcome. AKI characteristics, its incidence and causes in sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion and nephrotoxin exposure will be reviewed. The impact of AKI on recovery and mortality as well as discussion of the use of new biomarkers which will replace BUN and creatinine. Critical care nursing assessment of the potential for AKI will include use of the most simple, accurate and useful biomarker we currently use today: urine output. Research on the usefulness of accurate urine output measurement on outcomes will also be reviewed and why we can make an impact on patient outcomes.
Objectives
1) Identify 2 characteristics of AKI
2) Describe one way renal ischemia can cause kidney injury
3) Identify one reason creatinine is not an accurate biomarker for indication of AKI
4) Identify a common, useful and accurate biomarker we have to use to indicate AKI

Break:
Coffee Break 10:20-10:40 @ Versailles Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Zhou Wentao, an advanced Practice Nurse, she is a PhD Candidate at National University of Singapore (NUS). She is the Assistant programme coordinator for the master of nursing program, which is training competent advanced practice nurses for Singapore. Her research interest focuses on care transition in situation, diseases process and role development, as well as inter-professional education. She has conducted studies together with her team to explore the outcome of inter-profession education by using simulation, and explored the collaboration among the juror nurses and junior physicians. Her PhD study is on patient entered transitional care for patients transferred form Intensive Care units to step-down care setting.

Abstract:

Background: Transfer from critical care to step-down care is a difficult time for patients, their relatives, as well as, healthcare providers. Patients often experience anxiety, depression, cognitive and physical impairment after being transferred out from intensive care unit (ICU), and these have known to delay their recovery. Other factors known to affect patient's transition experiences are poor discharge planning, inadequate handover, and suboptimal follow up care. Effective transitional care has the potential to improve the patients’ continuity of care after ICU discharge, patient's satisfaction, reduce depression and anxiety related to relocation, and improve healthcare provider's job satisfaction and multidisciplinary collaboration. Studies suggested that interventions for patients who experience ICU relocation distress need to address patient's physical, psychosocial, and cognitive need, as well as other factors that affect the patient's continuity care from ICU to step- down care.
Objectives/aims: This study aims to explore patient's transition experience and ways healthcare providers can help their transition from ICU to step-down care. The outcome of this research will subsequently assist in developing and evaluating a Patient Centered Transitional Care (PCTC) protocol. This PCTC protocol aims to improve patient's satisfaction towards continuity of care from ICU to Step-down care, reduce patient's ICU readmission after ICU transfer, decrease patients’ relocation depression and anxiety level, improve communication among healthcare providers, and improve nurse’ decision making ability.
Method/design: This mixed methods study has two phases. Phase 1 qualitative study will explore both patients’ transition experience, and healthcare provider's perception of patient's transition experience and transitional care provided during the ICU transfer to step-down care unit. The qualitative data will be collected through face-to face interview with patients and focus group interview with healthcare providers. The content analysis of this phase will use a constant comparative data analysis method. The themes derived from this phase will help to develop a PCTC Protocol supported by up-to-date literatures and clinical expert contributions from industry stakeholders. Transitional midrange theory will be used to guide the study and the PCTC protocol within the paradigmatic perspective of transitional care. Phase 2 quantitative study will examine and evaluate the effectiveness of PCTC protocol by adopting validate measurements, and pre and post-test comparison design will be used.
Significance of the study: The PCTC protocol will direct a goal orientated transitional care process for healthcare providers as well as patients who transferred from ICU to step-down care. PCTC protocol will enable healthcare providers to be more aware of patient's transitional needs and facilitate patient's continuity of care defectively, therefore patients can have their maximize recovery.

Speaker
Biography:

Tembo is a conjoint lecturer at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia, practicing Intensive care nurse at Newcastle Private Hospital and a stroke research coordinator at the John Hunter Hospital in NSW, Australia. She has presented as an invited speaker at national and international conferences. Dr. Tembo has published in high impact journals. Her research interests lie in the impact of practice innovations and technological advances in Intensive Care Unit critically ill patients and Stroke nursing.

Abstract:

Communication difficulties in intensive care units (ICU) in critically ill patients have been well documented for more than three decades. However, data about communication difficulties beyond ICU are sparse. This paper discusses the experience of communication difficulties in critically ill patients in ICU and beyond as part of the findings of a larger study that explored the lived experiences of critically ill patients in ICU in the context of Daily sedation interruption (DSI). The aim of the study was to describe the lived experience of people who were critically ill in ICU using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach in the DSI context. Twelve participants aged between 20 and 76 years with an ICU stay ranging from 3 to 36 days were recruited from a 16 bed ICU in a large regional referral hospital in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Participants were intubated, mechanically ventilated and underwent DSI during their critical illness in ICU. In-depth face to face interviews with participants were conducted at two weeks after discharge from ICU and at six to eleven months later. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Thematic analysis using van Manen’s (1990) method was completed. The overarching theme; ‘Being in limbo’, and subthemes ‘Being disrupted’; ‘Being imprisoned’ and ‘Being trapped’ depict the main elements of the experience. Recommendations are made for new models of care that support and mitigate critically ill patients’ communication concerns in ICU and beyond. Further research into the causes, prevention and treatment is needed.

Speaker
Biography:

Barbara Ann M. Messina completed her PhD at Adelphi University in Garden City, NY. Dr. Messina has developed, instituted, published and presented on several innovative undergraduate baccalaureate degree clinical practicums. Dr. Messina is an Associate Professor at Long Island University/Post in School of Health Professions and Nursing. Additionally, Dr. Messina serves as a reviewer for the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and is an Active member of multiple Professional Organizations including the American Nurses Association, the National League of Nursing and the Association of Higher Education.

Abstract:

Current nursing shortages (Buerhas, Staiger, & Auerbach, 2009) and unsuccessful nursing orientation programs have been a major concern for the past decade because they result in high financial costs to the organization, decreased job satisfaction and poor retention of nurses all of which can impact the quality of patient care (Willemsen-McBride, 2010). Retention in the specialty areas such as the operating room (OR) is particularly vulnerable due to the stressful working environment in this specialty. It has been estimated that approximately 35% to 65% of new nurse graduates will leave their work place within the first year of employment, lending to the 55% nursing turnover rate (Willemsen-McBride, 2010). Approximately only 4 percent of all RNs pursue a career in the OR and within the next 5 years about 20 percent of all RNs in the OR are expected to retire (Girard, 2004). Thus, establishing successful recruitment and retention strategies of new nurses to the OR is paramount.
The purpose of this study was to:
• recruit graduating basic baccalaureate degree nursing students to the OR and
• decrease the attrition of new graduate hires to the OR environment.
Utilizing Knowles theory (Knowles, 1968; Knowles, 1980) a peri-operative clinical experience was developed in accordance with the AORN guidelines for peri-operative orientation for new nurses (AORN, 2012). Eight years after the institution of this study project an 82% retention rate has been maintained.

Nourah Alsadaan

University of Technology Sydney, Australia

Title: Nursing workforce challenges in Saudi Arabia and the role of transformational leadership

Time : 11:40-12:00

Biography:

Nourah Alsadaan is Ph.D. Candidate from the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. She obtained Master of Nursing (Clinical Leadership) at the University of Western Sydney, Australia and Bachelor of Science in Nursing at King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Purpose: To identify challenges in the nursing workforce development in Saudi Arabia; and identify the role of transformational leadership within the nursing context in improving the performance of healthcare organizations.
Organizing construct: Literature review of published research articles discussing nursing workforce development in Saudi Arabia, along with the role of nursing leaders and the impact of transformational leadership in improving the performance of the nursing workforce.
Method: Literature published between 2000 and 2012 was reviewed from 5 electronic databases, including the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Pro Quest Central, Expanded Academic ASAP, Wiley Interscience (Wiley), MEDLINE (OVID), and SAGE. In consultation with a health librarian, databases were accessed using key words: Saudi Arabia, nursing, nursing leadership, and transformational leadership.
Findings: In Saudi Arabia, inadequate numbers of national nurses has prompted an increase in recruitment of inexperienced expatriate nurses. However, Saudi Arabia ends up losing the nurses once they gain experience, as they prefer move to more developed countries. Many expatriate nurses have been found to lack competencies in the English language and familiarity with the Arabic language, hence language and communication are significant issues that should be addressed to enhance the interaction with the nurses and the local population. Insufficient experience among new expatriate nurses generates additional workload for experienced nurses, and this presents a great challenge to the improvement of nursing practice. The current nursing shortage in Saudi Arabia requires nurse leaders to re-examine their approaches to leadership. Nursing leadership in Saudi Arabia has been found to be more effective with a transformational approach.
Conclusion: To effectively manage the challenges associated with the nursing shortage, quality of patient care, language competencies, communication difficulties, and necessary experiences of nurses, the Saudi healthcare system needs successful, motivated, and visionary leaders. Appropriate leadership approaches should be targeted towards the improvement of nursing workforce. Specifically, leadership styles that seek to improve nurses’ satisfaction, motivation and performance are needed.
Clinical relevance: The findings provide enhanced awareness and understanding of challenges facing nursing workforce in Saudi Arabia. Findings may assist with the development of leadership strategies to facilitate and overcome nursing workforce challenges and improve patient outcomes.

Biography:

Praneed Songwathana has completed her Ph.D at the age of 37 years from Medical School, University of Queensland and Fellowship at Griffith University, Australia. She is currently a director of research center for people with trauma, emergency and disaster. She has published more than 20 papers in both national and international journals h year and serving as an editorial board member of AENJ and Thai Nursing Journal.

Abstract:

Background: Improving care outcomes in trauma patients is regarded as important and linked to an appropriate model of care particularly in social unrest area where there are limited resources and accessibility after discharge. A specific model of continuing care for those trauma survivors is required.
Objective: This participatory action research was aimed to develop the trauma based continuing care model (TCCM) for enhancing care outcomes in trauma patients affected from Social Unrest area.
Method: A three-phase of PAR design was implemented with stakeholders in both hospital and community services related to care for trauma survivors and families. In the first phase, 11 trauma survivors were interviewed and 3 focus group discussions of nurses and related health care staffs were conducted to identify existing system and problems encountered. The second phase consisted of two workshops, involving 20 key informants and allied health staff for the purpose of developing the model. The final phase evaluated the initial effects of the model after implementing with 20 patients by measuring the care process and outcomes such as nurses’ satisfaction, patient quality of life, patient’s self care ability, caregiver’s ability to care. Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics for care outcomes and content analysis for the care process.
Result: The model consisted of a) trauma care process through a trauma nurse-initiated discharge planning program b) patient- familyfollow up. With the PAR process, the following steps included 1) preparing the multidisciplinary health care team including patient and family caregivers, 2) organizing the system, identify individual role and function for continuing care 3) collaborating with community support network for patient and family management. The main strategies to drive all process were teamwork involvement, care coordination, and staff education. The model could enhance both health care staff and family caregivers in providing better care. In this study, most patients were able to manage themselves. 20 patients and 10 family caregivers were satisfied with care process and obtained better outcomes such as health statusand quality of life. In addition, the developed trauma nurse-initiated discharge planning program was also discussed for further implication.
Conclusion: The key success was derived from trauma nurse-initiated discharge planning process and collaborating with community support network. To enhance the sustainability of the model, care managed by enhancing networking of community nurse, patient and family after discharge is required for further exploration.

Katie Kok

Millikin University, USA

Title: Patient education and anticoagulation therapy in a cardiac population

Time : 12:20-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Katie Kok is currently a graduate nursing student at Millikin University School of Nursing in Decatur, Illinois and will graduate in December 2014. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. While studying at Millikin University she became particularly interested in patient education and health literacy and the challenges patients face with adhering to treatment recommendations.

Abstract:

Anticoagulation therapy is a prevalent and effective treatment for the prevention of stroke and other complications resulting from many cardiac conditions. Unfortunately, management of anticoagulation therapy is difficult, and mismanagement can have severe, adverse effects. In addition, inadequate health literacy is a prevalent issue and a barrier to patient education in the United States. The purpose of this research study was to examine health literacy and patient knowledge as they relate to anticoagulation therapy in a cardiac population. This pilot study used a prospective, descriptive design to assess the knowledge of anticoagulation therapy of participants (n = 35) and their health literacy using a questionnaire that included the Brief Health Literacy Screening Tool. Results of the study demonstrated that 35% of the patients had inadequate or marginal health literacy despite the fact that 60% of the participants had education past high school/GED; next, the overall knowledge of patients was low (63%) even though 88.6% of the patients reported receiving instruction regarding anticoagulation therapy from their healthcare provider; and although patients reported learning from printed materials, the low health literacy and low reported knowledge indicate these methods were ineffective for patient education. The results of this study demonstrate that among patients with a cardiac condition on anticoagulation therapy, patient education has the potential to improve knowledge, but only if the education is targeted to the learning styles and educational needs of patients throughout therapy.

Speaker
Biography:

AL-Rawajfah has completed his PhD in 2007 from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He served as Dean of Nursing of the Faculty of nursing at Al Al-Bayt university-Jordan for the past 4 years. Dr. AL-Rawajfah’s research area is mainly in infection control. He as published many papers in reputed journals and serve as expert reviewer of several international journals. Dr. AL-Rawajfah presented his research work in different international conferences and invited as speaker in the field of infection control.

Abstract:

Background: Studies demonstrated that prevalence of Healthcare Associated Infections (HCAIs) in intensive care units (ICUs) are much higher than other units. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control recommends periodic assessment of Infection control (IC) practices for healthcare workers as an effective strategy to control HCAIs. This study evaluated IC practices among Jordanian staff nurses working in critical care areas.
Methods: This cross-sectional study used a stratified, cluster random sampling technique. The nationally representative sample consisted of critical care RNs from all major healthcare service providers and from all geographical areas in Jordan. The IC-Practices Tool (ICPT) is a reliable (Cronbach alph = 0.88) self-report instrument that was used for this study.
Results: A total of 21 hospitals participated in the study, of which, 8 were governmental, 7 military, 4 private, and 2 university-affiliated. The final sample consisted of 247 RNs from 56 critical care units. Of the total sample, 51% were female with a mean age of 28.5 years (SD = 5.2). The majority of the sample (84.6%) held a BSN degree and 54.7% worked in general ICUs. The overall IC practice score ranged from 78 to 145 (maximum = 145) with a mean score of 122.6 (SD = 13.2). Of the total sample, 25.5% scored below the 75th percentile, (weakly compliant on the scale compliance categories). Nurses who reported that they had been trained about IC procedures in their hospital scored higher on the IC practice scale (M = 124.3, SD = 12.3) than nurses who reported that they never received any IC training in the hospital (M = 117.3, SD = 14.6, p < 0.001). Moreover, nurses who reported that they received IC training outside their hospital demonstrated higher scores (M = 126.2, SD = 11.7) than those who never received such training (M = 121.8, SD = 13.4, p < 0.05).
Conclusion: This study demonstrated the importance of staff education as an effective method to improve IC practice in ICU settings. Also, this study demonstrated the importance of availability of IC resources (e.g. hand washing facilities, protective equipment) to enhance safe IC practice in critical care settings.

Break:
Lunch Break 13:00-13:40 @ Monaco
  • Adult Health Nursing
    Track 7: Women Health Nursing
Location: Versailles - C
Speaker

Chair

Anjan Bhattacharya

Apollo Gleneagles Hospital
India

Speaker

Co-Chair

Patrice Tadel

Gundersen Health System
USA

Session Introduction

Yasuko Fukaya

Kanto Gakuin University, Japan

Title: Communication as care for the elderly

Time : 13:40-14:00

Speaker
Biography:

Yasuko Fukaya has completed her PhD at 1999 from Tokyo University, Japan. She is Professor, department of Home Care Nursing, at Kanto Gakuin University, Japan.

Abstract:

Communication has important implications for the building of personal relationships and for human dignity. Such being the case, we first conducted a survey of the actual situation of the communication between the elderly and their caregivers. The result showed that there were two types of verbal communications between the elderly and their caregivers. One is "Type I communication" (Task-Performatory communication) based on a variety of nursing or care service, and it accounted for 75.9% of the total. The other is "Type II communication" (Life-Worldly communication) based on family, business, and social events of their normal social life, and it was found that the latter elicited more speech from the elderly than the former did. In a second-stage survey, we then implemented an educational intervention for the care staff to facilitate "Type II talking", and measured its effectiveness. Although the result showed that the effectiveness varied between facilities, the amount of time the care staff spent on type II talking increased significantly a week after the intervention and, at the same time, the amount of time the elderly spent on type II talking and on voluntary speech increased significantly. The reasons were that the care staff provided topics on the world of living to which the elderly belong, as the topics they should talk about; that the response from the elderly was supported by the care staff’s laughter, their expression of agreement, and their expression of strong interest; and that the elderly were given opportunities to develop the topics by being treated as “speakers.”

Speaker
Biography:

Hagell has a clinical background in neuroscience nursing subspecializing in movement disorders, and completed his PhD at the age of 35 years from Lund University. He is professor of neurological caring science at Kristianstad University (Sweden). His research focuses on measuring and understanding outcomes and disease impact in neurological and other long-term conditions. He has published more than 80 papers in reputed international scientific journals and has served on several editorial, organizing and scientific boards and committees as well as in leadership positions of professional organizations.

Abstract:

Clinical trial rating scale based outcome measures have been criticized of lacking relevance and meaning to end-users, particularly patients. This is concerning since inferences regarding the usefulness of therapies are based on rating scale derived numbers. In order to be meaningful and in accord with their purpose in clinical trials, rating scale based outcome measures should not only be rigorous measures of the variables they intend to quantify, but they also need to represent variables that are important to end-users such as patients and health care professionals. This requires an understanding of what to measure, and state-of-the-art psychometric methods to ensure that rating scale derived data represent meaningful quantitative measures. However, relatively little is known about what variables that people with, e.g. Parkinson’s disease (PD) prioritize for outcome measurement and how this compares to the views of health care professionals. These issues will be discussed and illustrated in view of recent mixed-methods (Group Concept Mapping) studies in PD. Results illustrate similarities in patients’ and health care professionals’ views in that both considered quality of life as the most important outcome variable and both ranked walking/mobility and sleeping problems among the top five outcome variables. This may serve as guidance in designing future clinical trials. However, data also illustrate important differences in conceptual perspectives. Considerations such as those revealed in these studies should be taken into account in order to render clinical trial outcomes more meaningful and interpretable from an end-user perspective.

Christine Stirling

University of Tasmania, Australia

Title: IM/NPACT – Developing aged care nurse practitioner roles in Australia

Time : 14:20-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Christine Stirling has a career long interest in improving community based healthcare through research. Christine is Deputy Dean Graduate Research at the University of Tasmania and Vice-President of the AAG National Board. Her research includes improving services for people with dementia and she was lead investigator on the IM/NPACT project. She had published widely in international peer reviewed journals and has received over 1.5 million dollars in research grants.

Abstract:

This paper describes the realistic evaluation results for a pilot project that trialed Aged Care Nurse Practitioner (ACNP) roles. The case study was undertaken over three years in the Australian state of Tasmania and was one of 33 national pilot projects. ACNPs use extended skills, knowledge and experience in the assessment, planning, implementation, diagnosis and evaluation of care needs but have been little used in Australia. The study evaluated three key ACNP roles: a nurse led memory clinic, ACNPs consulting in doctor’s surgeries, and the ACNP consulting into community settings. The study questions focused on the nature of the ACNP therapeutic encounters, the care collaborations with providers and managers, and the logistical arrangements of setting up the new services. Demographic and clinical data from clients, videorecording of consultations, clinic documentation, and interviews were used to evaluate the ACNP roles. The results highlight the capacity of the ACNP in running a memory clinic and client profiles demonstrated some unusual patterns which may have been related to the open referral policy and being nurse-led. The ACNP in the doctor’s surgery saw a diverse group of clients ranging from 29 to 99 years of age; 63% presented with multimorbid conditions, 22% were diagnosed with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. Developing suitable collaborative arrangements was often time consuming, particularly concerning funding arrangements. Overall, the project demonstrated the benefits of expert ACNP roles in primary health care settings, but also difficulty in establishing new roles within the constraints presented by the current Australian system.

Nevin Altintop

University of Vienna, Austria

Title: Elderly care for migrants: Between marginalisation and sensitive inclusion

Time : 14:40-15:00

Biography:

Nevin Altintop has completed her studies in Nursing Science (Pflegewissenschaft) at the University of Vienna in 2010 where she holds a Magister title. She currently works on her PhD at the University of Vienna (Austria). Her research focuses on migrants and migration aspects in health care, geriatrics and palliative care. She regularly is invited to workshops and seminars on topics in health care and cultural sensitive elderly care.

Abstract:

The diversity and increasing number of elder migrants within the German and Austrian population is challenging the health care systems: How can they be included in an adequate (culturally sensitive) way? The ongoing academic discussions and the different approaches in practice to this question reveal how differently elder migrants and their needs are perceived within the German and Austrian society. In my talk I will introduce the different perceptions of a culturally sensitive elderly care upon the predominant paradigms that may vary locally – the intercultural opening in German cities and a diversity management approach in Vienna (Austria), and upon the estimations and assessments of the importance of a culturally sensitive elderly care, how they varied within the last decade and among different groups of people. In my analysis I will demonstrate how weak and vulnerable culturally sensitive – and, therefore, individual health care solutions are when they encounter economic decisions that are oriented on profit: a culturally specific or sensitive elderly care is regarded as market niche, elder migrants are the new clients within the elderly care sector who have to accept specific health care solutions. Finally, it can be shown, that the actual situation of a culturally sensitive health care in Germany and Austria takes a delicate balance between inclusion and marginalization of elder migrants.

Patrice Tadel

Gundersen Health System, USA

Title: Wandering in the patient narrative: Opportunities to fully engage

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Pat Tadel is a Senior Faculty/Consultant with Respecting Choices® in La Crosse, WI. She has over 18 years of experience in hospice and palliative care. She holds a post-doctoral certificate in Medical Ethics and clinical roles have included hospice case management, leadership, and administration. She is a current member of the Ethics Council for NHPCO, ELNEC trainer, and frequent national speaker on issues related to facilitation, bioethics mediation, and end of life ethics. Her commitment to engagement in the patient narrative is evident in ongoing work with special populations, including veterans at end of life, and access for underserved populations.

Abstract:

Working in the patient narrative has become a familiar term, used as part of the common language in the context of caring for patients. To do so encompasses sharing conversation that allows exploration of the entire patient experience as it relates to health and illness. However, the complexity of engaging in conversations about life-altering disease trajectories, potential outcomes from treatment, and end-of-life decisions is a learned practice. To stand steady with conflict, allowing for expression of grief, loss, anger, and frustration, yet remaining fully present, maintaining neutrality, and actively listening continue to be challenging concepts in practice. To do so is integral to collaborative practice and essential to effective engagement. A literature review identified key elements of intentional interactions which lead to significant opportunities to “wander more fully” in the patient narrative. Case studies used in discussion will demonstrate how patient/clinician encounters, such as end-of-life discussions; afford the interdisciplinary team members purposeful engagement with patients. Application of these principles will support clinicians in real world situations to delve more deeply into the patient experience. Such exploration lays the foundation for assuring goals of care are aligned with patient’s individual goals and values. Cases also demonstrate how the use of symbols by patients can be understood to assist in dialogue related to expressions of illness or tasks of dying. When directed and focused, intentional facilitation occurs, the patient’s unique holistic needs and values are identified and goals of care can be clarified. Practice implications are presented using research and clinical applications.

Margaretha Pejner

Halmstad University, Sweden

Title: The bright side of life- Emotional support in elderly care

Time : 15:20-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Margaretha Norell Pejner has completed her PhD at Örebro University, Sweden. She is a district nurse with several years of experience in both inpatient care as municipal home care. The experience includes both clinical work, leadership and supervision. For the past six years, she has been teaching in Halmstad University in the nursing and specialist nursing with specialization in district nurse. The main focus on her research is the importance of the emotional support in order to experience health among older people with multiple illnesses.

Abstract:

Background: When older patients are in need of care the desire for help is often related to practical duties and also express a preference for support with the emotional difficulties that disease and illness cause. The concept of support in nursing is widely used and in nursing practice it is seldom specified which kind of support that has been performed. Aim: To explore and describe which supportive intervention registered nurses use in municipal elderly home care settings and if it is in agreement with the patient’s preferences. Methods: One retrospective descriptive study (I) were conducted and followed up by three qualitative studies using Grounded Theory as a method (II-IV). Grounded Theory allows exploring actions/interactions and processes that occur between complex social phenomena. A process is seen as a continuous action in relation to a determinate purpose to reach a goal with a problem or a situation and actors can choose actions to influence the course of events. Data collection and sampling: I- Using a web based form describing 7053 interventions given to patients 80 years or older during the months of April and October 2004-2008. II- Observation of 12 registered nurses supportive interventions during the home visit of 36 patients between 80 and 102 years. III- Interviews with 16 registered nurses. IV- Interviews with 18 patients between 80 and 96 years. Results: Combining the four studies in a substantive theory shows that supportive interventions were based on patients’ preferences and guided by their emotions. The emotional support resulted in that the patient could experience serenity. Serenity is a state of relief and the moment required for the patient to be able to move forward. Patients with reduced ability to process their emotions make them stuck in a state of stress with additional experience of disease and illness. To get out of their state the patient searched the registered nurse whose mission is to identify their needs in order that they could find relief. The theory also shows the strengths and weaknesses in the process. Emotional support should be developed as a nursing intervention and can be integrated as a part of nursing.

Speaker
Biography:

Anjan Bhattacharya, MBBS (Cal); DCH (UK); MRCP (UK); MRCPCH (UK), pioneered India’s first Child Development Centre in corporate healthcare set up at Apollo Gleneagles Hospital, Kolkata. WHO International expert on ICF-CY pioneering Paediatric Core Standard setting exercise. Runs IPPC/DCH Paediatric Post Graduate course of Sydney University, Australia from Eastern India. Invigilator of MRCPCH, UK India Examinations. National Appraiser of DNB post graduate medical teaching centre. Ex-head, DNB program of Paediatric Department of AGH, Kolkata. National course designer of Training of the Trainer module on Emotional Intelligence of Indian Academy of Pediatrics, Presidential Action Plan, 2014. Pioneer Award and Bharat Jyoti Awardee.

Abstract:

Emotional/Educational, Behavioral and Developmental [EBD] problems including Dyslexia, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) constitutes 20% of children suffering globally, often unnecessarily. A sizable number of such children are passing through the hands of nurses in healthcare set ups, both in-patient and out-patients (including community and immunization clinics).
Missed opportunities of reporting EBD concerns must be one of the important determinant of such morbidity. Opportunities may be missed due to –
• Lack of awareness of their existence
• Inadequate learning to aid spotting them
• Interobserver variations, bias, prejudices
• Brushing off subtle concerns as “may be, I am being silly”
• Lack of trained supervision and vetting skills in health professionals
• Acknowledging that this is a concern and yet not knowing how to go about it
Current author proposes an universal model in a 15-20 minute oral presentation on how a nurse can improve vastly up on the knowledge and professional input so that the “miss outs” are minimized to enable Early Detection and Early Intervention

Break:
Coffee Break 16:00-16:20 @ Versailles Foyer

Jehad O Halabi

King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Saudi Arabia

Title: Prevalence and risk factors of incontinence among Emirati women with diabetes

Time : 16:20-16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Jehad O Halabi did PhD from University of Illinois at Chicago. He is Associate Professor at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences in Jeddah. He has held several administrative posts including Head of Department, Assistant Dean and Associate Dean at, the University of Jordan and in Jeddah. Editorial Board member of Transcultural Nursing Journal, Scandinavian Journal for Caring Sciences, Education Research Journal, and Image: Sigma Theta Tau International Journal. He is member in two STTI chapters in Chicago and Sweden. He is Project and Leader coordinator of International Exchange Projects with Sweden.

Abstract:

Diabetes mellitus has high prevalence among Emirati women leading to urinary incontinence, a significantly embarrassing for women with several emotional, psychological and financial implications. As a private problem, it goes unnoted and not cared for by nurses and healthcare providers. Few studies reported this problem among Arabian women. The study estimates the prevalence and risk factors for urinary incontinence among Emirati diabetic women. A standardized questionnaire was implemented with a probability sampling of 360 Emirati diabetic women aged 25-65 years at six health care centers. The largest three emirates were selected and representation of the whole country was assured. Ethical considerations were secured. A Survey Arabic Questionnaire including seven personal interview data items pertaining were used from NHANES–Kidney Conditions–Urology after securing its psychometric properties. Mean age was 48 years, clinically diagnosed with 1o years or more of DM, using oral hypoglycemic agents. Majority were married with five or more children. Most were overweight or obese. Two thirds reported UTI and incontinence. Logistic regression indicated that diabetes duration was the most significant risk factor for incontinence. Incontinence is not disclosed among Emirati women. However, prevalence was higher than that reported by diabetic women in other cultures. Early screening is needed for Muslim women preferably by female care providers including health promotion strategies, increasing awareness, and culturally appropriate strategies for teaching and treating this complication. It is strongly recommended to have qualitative studies on this group of women to deeply understand the physical, social, and psychological impact of incontinence on their lives.

Speaker
Biography:

Amina El-Nemer, PhD (2003) School of Health Studies, Division of Midwifery and women’s Health, Bradford University, UK, Diplom in research ethics, Maryland University, USA (2007). Associate Professor at the Department of women's Health and Midwifery Nursing, Vice Dean of Culture and Community Affairs, Director of Quality Assurance and Accreditation Unit, Faculty of Nursing, Mansoura University, Egypt. I am having a challenging career in the area of Health Research Ethics, women health, with special interest in empowerment of women. My main focus is normality of childbirth through introducing EBP and PBL in teaching maternity nursing and applying TQM in Higher Education and nursing practice. I am acting as a country co-investigator and coordinator of the study in Egypt called "Development and Implementation of a Labour Companionship Model for Integration in Public Hospitals in Three Arab Middle-Income Countries in Egypt, Lebanon and Syria". I am responsible for the implementation of the project in Egypt.

Abstract:

Despite all the efforts done by Egyptian government to achieve the Millennium Development goals, there is a question regarding the quality of care provided to the Egyptian women during pregnancy and delivery The maternal near-miss has becomes an indicator for quality obstetrics care and for better understanding of the causes of maternal morbidity as because it occurs more frequently than maternal deaths. The aim was to investigate the quality of maternal care provided to survivor's women who developed morbidity in pregnancy and during delivery at Mansoura University Hospital (MUH) Egypt. Using World Health Organization (WHO) near-miss tool for maternal health to identify variables associated. A descriptive study was applied using data from MUH near miss women's records during pregnancy and delivery between October and September 2013. There were 80 cases with life threatening and morbidity conditions, near-misses. The main morbidity conditions were severe pre eclampsia, severe hemorrhage, eclampsia and sepsis. More than 80% of cases went through critical care such as ICU, blood products and laparotomy. 79% of cases experienced organs dysfunction and 5% were died the main associated causes were anemia, previous CS and obstructed labour. Cesarean Section was the main pregnancy outcomes for the near misses (93%). Also, the process and outcome indicators in different morbidity conditions were highlighted. WHO auditing tool gives a better picture of maternity health problems during pregnancy and delivery, providing a thorough evaluation of the quality of healthcare and suggesting improvements as it reflects the scope of complications in maternity care and improves maternal outcomes.

Speaker
Biography:

Suzan Elsaid Mansour is lecturer at nursing faculty, mansoura university, Egypt. She has completed his Ph.D at the age of 33 years from Ain Shams University, Egypt. She is the specialized in woman's health and midwifery nursing. She has published several papers in national and international journals. In addition to her teaching responsibilities, Dr Suzan serves as coordinator for the specialty programs of technical nursing institution. She has experience in teaching undergraduate and post graduate students. She is interested in scientific research especially topics related to evidence based and quality of nursing care.

Abstract:

Persistent nausea and vomiting associated with hyperemesis gravidarum in early pregnancy remains a significant health problem that result in negative side effects on women and their pregnancy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nurses using for P6 acupressure on nausea, vomiting and retching in women with hyperemesis gravidarum. A Randomized Clinical Trial design was utilized in the current study. The current study conducted on 115 women diagnosed with hyperemesis gravidarum admitted to maternity high risk care unit at Mansoura University Hospital for six months, they were divided randomly in two groups: P6 acupressure and control group. Data were collected by two tools; 1stA structured Interviewing Questionnaire Schedulewas used to assess socio-demographic characteristics and obstetrical history, and 2ndIndex of Nausea, Vomiting and Retching(INVR) was used to assess the degree of nausea, vomiting and retching by three physical symptoms of Rhode's score. Study results showed that more than half of women in the study & control group were between the ages (20- 29) year, with a mean age 26.67±5.42 and 27.07±5.40. No statistically significantdifference was found in baseline characteristics of nausea, vomiting and dry retching scores between the study & control group,there was statistically significantly difference in mean difference Rhodes index scores (vomiting, nausea, retching and total score) between baseline and after intervention across the four assessment days for study and control group with mean levels (8.77±0.58, 7.74±0.53; respectively)for nausea, (8.54±0.79, 7.71±0.51;respectively)for vomiting and (5.70 ± 0.41,4.77±0.42; respectively) for retching. These results pointed out that the p6 acupressure group had statistically significantly lower degree of nausea, vomiting and retching over time (p<0.001).The study concluded that using of P6-acupressure was an effective in reducing nausea, vomiting and retching episodes in women with hyperemesis gravidarum. Based on the finding of the present study the following were recommended provision of training programs for nurses toward p6 acupressure technique, using of P6 acupressure as nursing intervention for reducing degree of nausea, vomiting and retching episode and application of more scientific researches on the effect of other non-pharmacological methods in relieving symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum.

Speaker
Biography:

Dorah Ursula Ramathuba, completed her doctoral studies in 2011 at North-West University. A Senior lecturer at the University of Venda, an oncology nurse. Has published articles in accredited journals. Area of specialty is Oncology nursing and women sexual health

Abstract:

Societal orientation places expectations about what it means to be a man and a woman, thus gender has powerful influence on sexual behavior. The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the extent culture and gender influence communication relating to sexual health and health seeking behaviours among rural women in Thulamela B municipality in Vhembe district of Limpopo Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research approach was used. A purposive sampling method was used to sample twenty five participants, where seven were interviewed and nineteen were subjected to focus group discussions. Data gathered from participants were analysed using Tesch’s eight steps of open coding techniques. The results indicated that many African women face inequitable sexual relations. In addition, the nature of their sexual bond with their partners affects their sexual decision making; and above all, power inequity, emotional and financial dependence seem to present significant obstacles to sexual decision making. This study therefore, recommends that educational and outreach efforts should focus on motivating change by responding to the socio-cultural factors, expectations, gender stereotypes that apply to men and women regarding their protection from sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS.

Majeda El Banna

University of Babylon, Iraq

Title: Sleep disturbances in pregnant women

Time : 17:40-18:00

Speaker
Biography:

Majeda M El-Banna has completed her PhD in Nursing from University of Nebraska Medical Center, USA. She is the Director of Associate Degree of Nursing to Baccalaureate/Master of Nursing program at the school of Nursing, the George Washington University. Her professional nursing experience in USA, Kuwait and Jordan includes practicing in many roles of increasing leadership and responsibility: registered nurse, clinical instructor, faculty, administrator as head of department and Dean of school of nursing. She has published and presented many papers nationally and internationally.

Abstract:

Research Objectives: To describe the prevalence and patterns of sleep disturbances among pregnant women in Iraq as measured by the Arabic version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scale as well as the relationship of sleep disturbances with demographic characteristics. Sample: Seventy pregnant women from two outpatient government-based maternal and child centersin Babel Governorate, Iraq. The age of participants ranged from 15 to 41 years, with a mean age of 26 years (SD=5.9). The majority of the participants were in the third trimester of their pregnancy (65%) and already had one or two children (62%). Findings: Most (86%) of the pregnant women reported that their sleep was disturbed by their child(ren) at least once a week and (63%). The PSQI global score mean was 8.3 (SD=2.3). 93% (n=65) of the subjects met the criteria for being poor sleepers. Participants in the study reported their mean sleep duration of 7.5 hours (SD=1.7), with an average of 22.5 minutes to fall sleep (SD=15.3). Trimester and total PSQI have a positive correlation (r=0.25, P<0.05), while a negative correlation was found between working and sleep latency (r= -.301 p<.005). Conclusions: Women who have never had sleeping problems may experience serious sleep disturbances during pregnancy which may be related to hormonal changes, age, pregnancy trimester, number of children, and working status. Sleep disturbances is a marker of worse health-related quality of life. Unmanaged sleep disturbances may have an adverse effect on labor and delivery.

SinYoung Kim

American Institute of Alternative Medicine, USA

Title: Health beliefs and breast cancer screening among Korean immigrant women

Time : 18:00-18:20

Speaker
Biography:

Sinyoung Kim is currently a nursing clinical faculty at the American Institute of Alternative Medicine in Columbus, Ohio. Originally from South Korea, Ms. Kim completed her Masters of Science in nursing degree from Capital University in Columbus, Ohio. Her expertise is in clinical skills teaching as well as simulation. She has co-authored an article on Breast Health Education and Screenings for Asian Women.

Abstract:

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Breast cancer screening with mammography has proved effective in reducing breast cancer mortality. While the incidence and overall mortality in Caucasian women has steadily decreased in the past decade, incidence and mortality rates among non-Caucasian, particularly Asian/Pacific Islander women has remained unchanged (CDC, 2012). Additionally, Korean immigrant women (KIW) living in the United States have extremely low screening rates as compared with other races (Lee, Fogg, & Saddler, 2006). There is a paucity of studies that focused on factors that influence screening rate in Korean women. The purpose of this pilot study is to identify key health beliefs that influence Korean immigrant women’s decision to participate in breast cancer screening so that the findings can contribute to increased KIW participation in breast health screening. Utilizing health belief theoretical model (Lee, Kim & Song, 2002) participants responded to two questionnaires used to measure the attitudes of KIW in their decision to have a mammogram. Certain health beliefs were significantly correlated with benefits and barriers of health screening. Focusing on improving health motivation through breast health education for this population will increase mammogram screening rate, thus increasing possibility toward improved overall health care.

  • Pediatric Nursing
Location: Vienna

Chair

Betty Boyle-Duke

New York University College of Nursing
USA

Session Introduction

Deborah Mattheus

University of Florida College of Medicine, USA

Title: Prevention, practicality and profitability of oral health promotion in primary care practice

Time : 09:40-10:00

Speaker
Biography:

Deborah Mattheus has completed her Ph.D. in Nursing from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Her doctoral research focused on the efficacy of oral health promotion programs in primary care practice. She current works at the University of Florida in Pediatric Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease as well as teaching on-line for the University of Hawaii at Hilo in their Doctoral Nursing Program and on-line for the University of Phoenix.

Abstract:

Oral health is a major public health issue affecting today’s children and families with dental caries continuing to be the most common chronic childhood disease. The major issue affecting pediatric oral health outcomes continues to be the shortage of pediatric dental service providers. The use of primary care providers as a first line defense in children’s oral health is a creative approach that can provide oral assessment, care and education to this vulnerable population. These frequent contacts at a young age also allow for referral to appropriate dental services that are willing and able to see children and care for their dental needs. Financial incentives for providing oral health care has helped to slowly increase the number of states and practices willing to include early oral health interventions. Therefore, based on the limited time required to perform standard oral health care visits, economic benefits to the practice, and satisfaction of impacting pediatric oral health outcomes, primary care providers should be motivate to integrate these programs into their practice.

Betty Boyle-Duke

New York University College of Nursing, USA

Title: Feeling good in your neighborhood: A nurse-led mobile health van program

Time : 10:00-10:20

Biography:

Betty Boyle Duke, RN, CPNP, is the Director of Clinical Services for the College of Nursing’s Mobile Health Van Program at New York University (NYU), and also an adjunct clinical instructor. As a pediatric nurse practitioner, she has worked with the adolescent population, specifically youth from socially disadvantaged backgrounds. She has held several positions as a clinician and administrator providing primary care and health education in the foster care setting as well as school based health. She holds membership in several professional organizations and is currently pursuing a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree at NYU.

Abstract:

The New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN) Mobile Health Van Program (MHVP) is a grant-funded innovative model of health care delivery. Through this model entitled “Set-Up, Catch-Up, Hook Up”, the MHVP strives to improve health care access for a predominantly immigrant adolescent population from New York City public high schools. The van’s location at the schools allows for increased ease of access by reducing transportation and scheduling barriers, which has been shown to improve health outcomes (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2012). This three-fold approach encompasses the following: 1) “Set-up”: An initial assessment of health care needs; 2) “Catch-up”: Addressing these outstanding needs through primary care services and health literacy education; 3) “Hook-up”: Linking patients with insurance, primary care providers, specialist services and referrals to community resources. Challenges in health care delivery and coordination of care, involving oral health, immunizations, and insurance will be discussed. The van also exposes nursing students to a unique pediatric clinical setting, promoting cultural competency in their training. The MHVP is charged with meeting the unique needs of its distinct patient population, while simultaneously affording an enriching clinical experience to future nurses. This health care delivery model may be replicated in communities with underserved and vulnerable populations to address critical health concerns in addition to decreasing barriers to care.

Break:
Coffee Break 10:20-10:40 @ Versailles Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Changrong Yuan has completed her PhD at the age of 36 years from Shanghai Second Military Medical University, China. She is the Professor of Nursing School of Shanghai Second Military Medical University. She has published more than 120 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of 6 SCI journals. In addition, Dr. Yuan is the editor-in-chief for Nursing Journal of Chinese PLA, a Chinese leading nursing journal since 1993. She serves as an advisory panel member for many kinds of grants review.

Abstract:

Backgrounds: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could evaluate the patient’s the symptoms and experience directly, it not only provide the information for clinicians to make treatment judgment, but also promote the communication between patients and clinicians. Pediatric PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System), one part of PROMIS, which aims to measure symptoms and experience of the pediatric patients with a variety of chronic disease by using the same sensitive measures and make possible new findings through direct comparisons. The objective of this study is to examine the measurement invariance of four pediatric PROMIS short forms between Chinese and American children and adolescents with cancer.
Methods: Children and adolescents (8-17 years old) with cancer were recruited in Chinese (N=232) and American (N=200) hospitals. Data of four pediatric PROMIS symptom short forms (i.e., Anxiety, Depression, Fatigue, and Pain) were analyzed in this study. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) models with ordered categorical items was conducted to examine factorial structure, invariance of measurement parameters (e.g., item thresholds and factor loadings) and structural parameters (e.g., factor means and variances) of the four PROMIS symptom scales separately.
Results: A limited number of non-invariant item thresholds (i.e.,four out of 32 item thresholds in Anxiety, nine in Depression, three in Fatigue and five in Pain)and factor loadings ( i.e., three out of eight factor loadings in Anxiety, two in Fatigue,one in Pain) were found in the four PROMIS symptom measures between the China and the American children cancer patients. No significant difference was found in test invariance of factor means and factor variance of the four short forms.
Conclusions: The Four Pediatric PROMIS symptom short forms (i.e., Anxiety, Depression, Fatigue, and Pain) seems to function uniformly across American and Chinese children groups. They can be used to compare cross-cultural results meaningfully between both countries after children and adolescents symptoms were validly measured.

Speaker
Biography:

Tcheunkeu Ebanga Nadine is a nurse working with the catholic health association of the Diocese of Buea.I am precisely the consulting nurse and nurse incharge of the pediatric unit in Catholic Health Center Fiango kumba.I was born in a little town in south west region of cameroon called kumba some 30years ago by mother Susan Tabe and father Tcheunkeu Thomas all of whom are cameroonains.I had an ordinary level and A level in science and later partionate about caring for people I proceeded to the university and acquired a higher national diploma in nursing and a bachelor degree in nursing. I am a happy mother of three kids one boy and two girls.

Abstract:

Identifying the merits and demerits of Traditional management of common cold in babies Cameroon case study kumba Regarding the fact that we are in Africa we have divers traditional beliefs as regard the management of some illnesses. This crossectional study targeted mothers to view their strategies in managing cold in their babies. Seven tribes were used for the research to give a clearer view on diversity. These trines were bayangis,bakwerains,Hausas,bangwas and the mbos. Results it was noted that despite the different origin of these mothers they all had similar methods of management.100% said the use palm oil and instill in both nostrils, while they also agreed that the some time use the commonly known macepou. Conclusively all the mothers tried home management of common cold About 60% of them had a positive result. Some also faced adverse effects due to their practice Solutions They were enlightened on the dangers of in stilling palm oil in the childs nostrils that it my cause Vaso Occlusion Dysnoea and even death Health education was also given during IWC and ANC visit to all mothers. Advising them to visit a doctor at least signed of nasal congestion.

Biography:

Rabiye GUNEY completed her MSc in 2005 at Marmara University and Ph.D in 2014 at İstanbul University in pediatric nursing branch. She studied on children with chronic illness during her postgraduate education. She completed 320-hours creative drama leadership program in a private course which was certified by the Ministry of Education of Turkey. Recently she works at the General Directorate of Health Research in the Ministry of Health of Turkey and coordinating the national research projects.

Abstract:

This study was conducted in order to determine the effect of the creative drama-based support program on the pyschosocial adjustment of adolescent with asthma. The study was performed as pre-test, post-test design on a single group. The set of the experimental group contained 867 adolescent asthma patients between 10-19 years old. All of 867 adolescents were called and invited for the study. Creative drama-based support program was carried out with 20 adolescent with asthma between 12-17 years old who accepted to participate in the study. The program was conducted in 3-hours sessions during 5 days with the total of 15 hours. The effect of the program was evaluated by the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 6-18 (CBCL/6-18) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) scores which were used before the program (pre-test) and one month after the program (post-test). As a result, the experimental group subjects got significantly better scores in total competence, internalizing and total problem of CBCL/6-18; in total competence, internalizing, externalizing and total problem of YSR after the program. This difference was caused by particularly significant score discrepancies in sub-tests of social, anxious/depressed, withdrawn/depressed, aggressive behavior and social problems. Psychosocial problems of adolescent with asthma should be taken into consideration by clinicians and creative drama-based programs should be born in mind as a supportive tool.

Speaker
Biography:

Changrong Yuan has completed her PhD at the age of 36 years from Shanghai Second Military Medical University, China. She is the Professor of Nursing School of Shanghai Second Military Medical University. She has published more than 120 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of 6 SCI journals. In addition, Dr. Yuan is the editor-in-chief for Nursing Journal of Chinese PLA, a Chinese leading nursing journal since 1993. She serves as an advisory panel member for many kinds of grants review.

Abstract:

Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the highest incidence malignancy among children under the age of 15 years old. For the limited cognitive ability of the children with ALL, family caregivers especially for the children’s parents are essential partners in the delivery of complex health care services and are mainly response for taking care of children in and out of the hospital. Thus, caregivers have huge care burden and urgently need professional and available support which can be satisfied by the technique of mobile health. Objective: To document the process of designing an application(app) operated on Android smartphones based on Internet, which is designed specifically for family caregivers of children with ALL.
Methods: Mixed methods encompassing individual interviews and group discussions with the stakeholders including ALL children’s family caregivers, professors in cancer care, and software engineers were used in this formative research.Results: The varied stakeholders welcomed the idea of developing a smartphone app to support the family caregivers of children with ALL. Our formative research revealed several major demandings of the caregivers in taking care of the children with ALL: limited access to evidence-based information, lack of social support and communication with doctors or nurses, insufficient disease-related knowledge, and inconvenient of recording the treatments and medical results. The feedback was incorporated into the development of the smartphone app. And finally we developed an app operated on Android smartphone with eight major modules: personal information, treatment tracking, family care, social support, knowledge education, self-assessment questionnaires, interactive platform and reminding module. And we also have a web-based backstage help to ensure the management of the basic function of the app.
Conclusions: Our mixed-method formative research led to the design of the smartphone app to support the family caregivers of children with ALL. The involvement of stakeholders were critical in the planning and design of the app in order to enhance program relevance, appeal, and match with the needs of target users.

  • Nursing Education & Research
Location: Vienna
Speaker

Chair

Linda Sweigart

Ball State University
USA

Session Introduction

Ruth Chen

McMaster University, Canada

Title: Facilitating online problem-Based learning in nursing education using multimedia learning principles

Time : 12:00-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Ruth Chen is an Assistant Professor at McMaster University, School of Nursing in Ontario, Canada. Her previous research involved pediatric asthma and pediatric pain management, and her clinical work as an NP/CNS was in the areas of anesthesia/pain management, and pediatric cardiology. She has a Bachelors Degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of California at Berkeley, a Master of Science in Nursing from Yale University, and a PhD from the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (HRM) at McMaster University. Her research interests are in online education and health professional identity formation within technology-rich practice environments.

Abstract:

Background: Online courses are rapidly being incorporated into higher education as learning technology systems allow for student engagement outside the classroom setting. Problem-based learning (PBL) courses have traditionally been delivered within in-person, face-to-face contexts. However, in nursing education, with students practicing in diverse and distant geographical contexts, the need has arisen to move PBL to an online, or distributed, medium to facilitate course delivery. Online courses require the instructor and students’ facility with learning technology. In addition, instructors must incorporate cognitive and education psychology principles of multimedia learning into their course design and implementation to optimize the student learning experience.
Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the experiences of senior-level nursing students who had completed a final year, online PBL nursing theory course as part of their Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BScN) degree program requirements.
Methods: A mixed-methods approach was used to gather data around three areas of student experience: 1) course delivery and technology features; 2) learning of content and theoretical concepts within a distributed (online) PBL context; 3) professional identity formation within an online learning context.
Results: Quantitative results demonstrated high learner satisfaction with the course and with the online PBL format. Qualitative themes arising from the open-ended questions suggested that students perceived learning to be effective within an online context. Once logistical and technology issues were addressed, the courses were effective in facilitating students’ interaction with colleagues, connection with the university, and independent learning and research of course content areas. Students did not perceive that taking an online PBL course in comparison to an in-class PBL course hindered their professional development.
Implications: Online PBL has great potential in health professions and university education to transform learning contexts, as the physical classroom is replaced by virtual classrooms which are spread across greater geographic distance. This learning is optimized when instructors apply principles of multimedia learning and cognitive load theory to course design and when facilitating online PBL sessions. Examples of instructional design approaches based on these principles, which are used to facilitate online PBL sessions, will be provided

Speaker
Biography:

Stuart is a Senior Lecturer in Adult Nursing where his predominant interest lay in clinical skills and simulation teaching, with a clinical background in Adult Day Surgery. Stuart is currently completing his MSc in Advanced Nursing and this presentation represents the work undertaken as part of those studies. Whilst recently new to the publishing and presenting circuit, Stuart has already presented internationally and was awarded ‘Highly Commended First Time Presenter’ at the 2011 NET Conference at Cambridge University.

Abstract:

Introduction A previous study highlighted that the health education of staff and patients in the UK was lacking around pre-operative fasting and that improvements were needed, even though national guidelines were in situ. This study aimed to focus upon addressing this issue starting with introducing an online teaching tool to pre-registration nursing students. To keep abreast of developments in the delivery of health education it is necessary to adopt new ways of teaching. Methods A summative evaluation approach was adopted, examining the outcome, or impact, of how the learning tool was received by the nursing students. The study observed an existing group of 99 pre-registration students undertaking a learning tool followed by a post-test to affirm their knowledge. Using this convenience sampling strategy a questionnaire was then posed with 62 completing the evaluation questionnaire, resulting in an 88.5% completion rate. Results The study showed engagement from the students and an enthusiasm for this type of teaching resource. The results from the post-test showed a high level of information uptake, 63% (n=44) of the students achieved a mark of 90% or higher and only 15% (n=11) achieving a mark of less than 70%. Supporting students in delivering evidence-based information to the patients and staff they work alongside. Discussion This evaluation research focuses upon an aspect of teaching which is becoming more widely used, exploring the students’ experience of online learning vs. the traditional face-to-face approach. This research supports a way of engaging students in delivering evidence-based information to others.

Speaker
Biography:

After years in clinical and managerial nursing, Linda Sweigart began teaching at Ball State University in 2004 while completing her post-master’s adult nurse practitioner. She teaches in the baccalaureate program and the distance RN to BSN and Master’s programs. During that time she has piloted several technologies including leading the transition to computer based tests, use of mobile devices for student response, interactive classroom systems, and implementation of virtual learning environment simulations. Use of virtual environments to develop and enhance interview skills began in fall of 2008. It has expanded from pre-licensure baccalaureate students, to hybrid LNP to BSN, distance RN to BSN students and master’s level courses. The technology has been utilized with over 1000 students and over 1400 encounters. She was selected for the 2011 Health Information Technology Scholars (HRSA grant program). National presentations have included poster and podium presentations at INASCL and NLN Conferences as well as at Purdue and Indiana Universities. Publications of work in virtual environments have appeared in refereed nursing journals. She is currently working with a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional group on the use of virtual learning environment activities to promote interprofessional TeamSTEPPS education for healthcare students. Mrs. Sweigart was a member of the BSU faculty team that successfully led to the School’s designation as a Center of Excellence for nursing education.

Abstract:

Beginning in 2008, nursing faculty in conjunction with simulation and technology partners (Institute for Digital Intermedia Arts), embarked upon a project to allow students a non-threatening environment in which to develop interview skills. A clinic was constructed on a virtual Second Life island. Utilizing multi-generational and multi-ethnic avatars, students had interview opportunities similar to real life clients. The Second Life virtual learning environment (VLE) was used by novice nursing students to conduct nutritional subjective assessments. Students complete interviews while volunteers, via avatars, responded with answers consistent with the standardized scenarios. When 90% of students indicated the VLE was a realistic and effective setting for skill development and requested additional experiences, a urogenital-sexual assessment was added. Each of the 23 virtual avatar clients had a urogenital-sexual history developed to match both age and ethnicity. Student satisfaction ratings were 75 to 95% positive with this activity as well. Data from independent reviews of videos of near 250 full face-to-face health history interviews from prior to and following implementation of virtual learning environment activities validated transference of learning from virtual environment interviews to human interviews. Results from this investigation supported the value of the virtual interview experiences in facilitating learning at Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning of application. Further, using Kirkpatrick’s Model of Four Levels of Learning Evaluation, results support learning at behavioral change level which is level 3. Practice in the virtual environment did result in learning that was applied and difference in performance level was measurable. Based on these successes, the VLEexperiences were expanded to the psychiatric course in the junior level. Selected avatars were enhanced with an evolving psychiatric case scenario. Avatars’ appearances were changed to reflect symptoms. Students interviewed avatars using a psychiatric tool.Students reflected the virtual experience allowed them to identify the type of information they needed to obtain from clients. Experience with over 1000 students has yielded similar evaluation results that supports students find virtual learning environment suitable for multiple applications. Similar activities were then expanded into distance RN to BSN and MSN programs.Implementing the Unity environment allowed ease of use on multiple devices. Student responses continued to be supportive of the value of the VLE experiences. Some 145 participants from 6 professions and 4 campuses had scores on validated attitudes questionnaire that revealed significant positive changes in all 5 domains of teamwork attitudes categories. The categories of leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support and communication were significant with p values of 0.001 and 0.002. Information on this cutting edge work will be shared.

Break:
Lunch Break 13:00-13:40 @ Monaco

Christine Stirling

University of Tasmania, Australia

Title: Critical realism for a nursing curriculum conceptual framework

Time : 13:40-14:00

Speaker
Biography:

Christine Stirling has a career long interest in improving community based healthcare through research. Christine is Deputy Dean Graduate Research at the University of Tasmania and Vice-President of the AAG National Board. Her research includes improving services for people with dementia and she was lead investigator on the IM/NPACT project. She had published widely in international peer reviewed journals and has received over 1.5 million dollars in research grants.

Abstract:

This paper describes how a Critical Realist (CR) philosophy, which acknowledges the interaction of agency, society and context, was used to assist in the reconceptualization of an undergraduate nursing curriculum. CR allows us to understand all individuals as thinking/reflective individuals with agency and identifies how this agency interacts with pre-existing social structures such as organizations (for example hospitals) and collective identities (such as nurses). Students have a diverse range of motivations for enrolling in nursing courses and bring different life experiences, but their undergraduate experiences must help them adopt the necessary features of the collective identity of a professional nurse. These features include critical thinking, the use of evidence based practice, person-centred care, and the range of skills and knowledge that nurses need at graduation. Not only does CR recognize the agency of nurses but also can help students understand the agency of the people for whom they care and the impact of life circumstances and social structures. This lends itself well to the development of a modern nursing curriculum that highlights tenets of 21st Century health care including autonomous decision-making, the self-management of chronic illnesses, and the social determinants of health. CR provides a strong contemporary solution to the need for nursing curricula to have a structural and theoretical framework that supports the student’s development as a professional through critical engagement with modern health care systems.

Hongli Wang

Chinese Nursing Journals Publishing House Co. Ltd, China

Title: Development of Chinese nursing journals in the digital environment

Time : 14:00-14:20

Biography:

Hongli Wang has completed master degree of news and communication from Peking University in 2009 and got bachelor from nursing school of medicine college of Peking University in 1991. She is the managing editor of Chinese Journal of Nursing and International Journal of Nursing Sciences. Both of the journals are sponsored by Chinese Nursing Association. Chinese Journal of Nursing is one of the best nursing journals in China with high IF.

Abstract:

In the digital environment, great changes have taken place in scholarly communication. Digital technology changed not only the form and content of journals, but also the operation mode, the scholarly publishing structure and publishing ideas. Digital environment has brought both opportunities and challenges to scholarly publishing and traditional print journals. There are no more than thirty nursing journals in China, and several of them are in English. There are differences among these journals on the level of digitization and network. The websites of the nursing periodicals in China divide into two sorts: using the cluster database platform, and independent registered website. In addition to online submission, review and revise, some journals can provide more online, or by wechat, such as advertising and information service. In the editing process, internet review and check of the review process with a mobile phone will be achieved by using new media resources. Information service, online education, knowledge of paper writing, e-mail bulletin, RSS subscription service, mobile phone short message service and wechat platform will play important roles. For distribution of periodicals,development and utilization of the conventional channels and network marketing should be combined. Conventional channels include subscription through post office, subscription from the editorial department. Flexible subscription through the network can provide to the user. And according to the requirements of the users sea, online journals or a single paper can be sent to users by e-mail or mobile phone text messages. In the digital environment, the nursing journals should not only meet the current service demand, keep focusing on the improvement of printed periodicals and development of network, but also look to the future, to make full use of new technologies and new media to meet the growing demands of readers and authors.

Lisa McDavid

Morehead State University, USA

Title: Enhance learning by utilizing simulation activities

Time : 14:20-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Lisa McDavid received her Associate Degree in Nursing from Ashland Community College in 1999. She worked at a local hospital for nine years gaining Medical Surgical and Surgery/OR experience. She then completed her MSN, RN with a focus in nursing education from Bellarmine University in 2007. Currently she is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Morehead State University. She has been in this position for five years. She is a member of the Kentucky League for Nursing and serves on the Board of Directors. She has presented at conferences on a state and national level.

Abstract:

Simulation activities performed in nursing programs can provide many learning opportunities for nursing students. Simulation gives the students a hands-on approach to perform skills learned throughout their nursing education. Real life simulated activities, allow students to put their knowledge into practice, while recognizing areas of weakness that need improvement. During the activities, students perform learned skills, medication administration, and professional communication. The environment to perform these activities is a safe learning environment to allow students to make and recognize mistakes prior to entering the career field. Faculty encourages students and assists in improving areas of weakness demonstrated by the students. The simulation activities begin with a pre-assignment to prepare for the lab, a hands-on approach to perform skills learned, followed by a debriefing session. The debriefing session consists of the student discussing a verbal self-evaluation regarding their performance, followed by a discussion with faculty. During the discussion, areas of weakness are identified and ways to improve are discussed. Students needing to improve are scheduled one-on-one time with lab personnel to improve on identified weakness area. By implementing simulation activities in the nursing program, students are more prepared to enter the workforce. In addition to hands-on, simulation labs are also utilized to enhance learning from the didactic setting. Simulation labs are scheduled according to the lecture schedule in order to enhance an understanding of the content delivered. By scheduling according to content, students can begin to connect theory and practice by learning in the classroom and demonstrating in the lab.

Speaker
Biography:

Lois Berry completed her Ph.D in 2010 from the University of Saskatchewan Department of Educational Administration, Saskatoon, Canada. She is currently the associate dean for North and North western Campus and Rural and Remote Engagement at the University of Saskatchewan College of Nursing. Dr Berry conducts research and publishes in the area of diversity, social justice, accessibility of health care, and health and education policy. She has been a nursing educator for over 35 years, as a clinical and classroom instructor and professor in programs at all levels of nursing, including LPN (LVN), diploma, baccalaureate, masters and PhD programs.

Abstract:

Nursing is largely a white, female, middle class profession. There is increasing recognition that vulnerable minorities benefit from working with health professionals who understand their culture, language and life experience. This has led to nursing organizations such as the International Council of Nurses and the Canadian Nurses Association advocating for increased participation of underrepresented minorities in the nursing profession. In northern Canada, there are few health professionals who are representative of the local population. Northern Canada’s population is made up of 85-90% Indigenous population. A history of colonization, reservation living, and residential schools, coupled with the current move away from traditional diet and ways of life, have left a legacy of poverty and illness, including high rates of accidental death, trauma and suicide, mental illness and addictions, cancer, heart disease and other health issues related to the social determinants of health. Health professionals are largely itinerant, coming to communities for two-three week stints and then returning south. They generally do not speak the language and may have limited knowledge of local culture and customs. In 2010, the College of Nursing at the University of Saskatchewan in western Canada engaged with two northern Saskatchewan communities to delivery nursing education in these communities. This presentation addresses the administrative, technological, political and community development lessons learned in successfully providing nursing education to Indigenous people in rural and remote areas. The importance of university and government level commitment, the administrative structures in nursing education that promote community engagement, the vital nature of technology, and the recognition of the importance of community champions at all levels are recognized as key to success. The challenges of working with the K-12 system to ensure qualified applicants and of indigenization of nursing curricula are ongoing.

Moniaree Jones

Auburn University, USA

Title: The lived experience of chronic pain in nurse educators

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Moniaree Parker Jones, EdD, MSN, COHN-S, CCM, is an Assistant Professor in Nursing at Auburn University at Montgomery and part-time Legal Nurse Consultant in Birmingham, Alabama. Prior to assuming her current positions, she worked as a legal nurse consultant with the law firms of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings, and Haskell, Slaughter, Young, and Rediker. She received her Associate Degree in Nursing from Troy University, a Bachelor’s in Nursing, and a Masters Degree in Nursing Case Management from the University Of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing. She holds her Doctorate degree in Instructional Leadership/ Emphasis Nurse Educator) from the University of Alabama. She is a past recipient of the Sigma Theta Tau Most Outstanding Masters in Nursing Student award and the Writer’s Award from the Capstone College of Nursing. She currently serves on the National Board as a Director-At- Large for the American Association of Legal Nurse Consultants in Chicago, IL. She is the local founder of the Central Alabama Association of Occupational Health Nurses and is current Vice President of the Greater Birmingham Association of Legal Nurse Consultants. She is a published journal and book chapter author with her latest publication on The Lived Experience of Chronic Pain in Nurse Educators.

Abstract:

Pain is associated with a wide range of disease and injury, and is sometimes the disease itself. Millions suffer from chronic pain every year and the effects of pain lead to tremendous costs for health care, rehabilitation, and lost worker productivity, as well as the emotional, psychological, and financial burden it places on patients and their families. The nurse has a key role in effective pain management with the need for accurate assessment, prompt intervention, and evaluation of pain relief measures for positive patient outcomes. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to frame this research study. The study employed a purposive sample of two Associate Degree Nurse (ADN) educators and one Baccalaureate (BSN) educator having personally experienced chronic pain. Semi-structured three-part interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The participants of study offered a depiction of the lived experience and the interpreter sought commonalities in meanings, situations, practices, and bodily experiences. Themes emerged, which aligned with and assisted in answering the research questions. Five essential themes from the study emerged: vulnerability, physician/provider trust, fear of disability, coping, and need for pedagogical discourse. Two subthemes: stoic and alien also emerged. Understanding the lived experience of nurse educators with chronic pain is important and valuable to health care. Nurse educators are responsible and challenged in their daily work with the need to teach about chronic pain in the best way possible, assuring the best care possible. The researcher explored the lived experience of nurse educators who have personally experienced chronic pain in order to develop a better understanding for discovery in nursing curriculum. Implications for nursing curriculum and practice relate to training nurse educators and students, addressing psychosocial issues, and incorporating how to do better chronic pain assessments and better manage chronic pain.

Speaker
Biography:

Sharon Elizabeth Metcalfe is currently an Associate Professor of Nursing at Western Carolina University in Asheville, North Carolina. For over 9 years, Sharon has been an Associate Professor of Nursing and has had previous academic appointments as a Dean of Nursing for a private and community college. Additionally, she has been an educational grants researcher and has focused on grant funding for partnerships with colleges and medical facilities. Sharon is currently serving on the Board of the North Carolina Nursing Association Foundation from 2010 to the present. Sharon has focused her nursing research agenda on global leadership development for nurses and on mentoring transformational nurse leaders to meet the needs of the future.

Abstract:

Learner Objectives: Participants attending this session will be able to describe the pedagogical methods being utilized in three innovative programs to promote diversity in nursing education. Participants attending this session will be able to synthesize approaches to comprehensive mentoring for diverse students to reach their goals of applying for nursing school.
Purpose: The purpose of the Nursing Network: Careers and Technology Program as authorized in Title VIII, Section 821 of the Public Health Service Act is to increase nursing education opportunities for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds (including racial and ethnic minorities under-represented among registered nurses). The NN-CAT (Nursing Network-Nursing Careers and Technology) program is designed to provide student stipends, scholarships, and opportunities for mentorship through three innovative sub-programs focusing upon increasing cultural inclusivity in nursing education.
Methods/Clinical Research Expertise Area/Pedagogy: The NN-CAT Mentoring Program was established in 2013 at Western Carolina University whose faculty were concerned about the shortage of a diversity of nursing students and nurses in the Western North Carolina region. The nursing mentoring program was established to provide individualized nursing mentors to guide minority and rural students to success in their pursuit to enter nursing school. The nursing mentoring program provides nursing mentors from both the community as well as the School of Nursing. Mentors are university prepared nurses that are trained to provide comprehensive individualized mentoring to prenursing students from rural counties in Western North Carolina. The second NN-CAT sub-program is the WCU School of Nursing (SON) and the MedCat Academy Program of Wake Forest University which partners to offer a summer collaborative in exploring health careers to promote academic success. The program features enhanced science preparation for high school students preparing to enter nursing school. The focus is upon encouraging students from disadvantaged and diverse backgrounds to pursue nursing.
The third NN-CAT sub-program consists of an enriched virtual Second Life science curriculum that is being developed by both the IT department of WCU and the science teachers in Cherokee, Graham, Swain, and Jackson counties and the Cherokee Indian Qualla Boundary. The purpose is to increase interest in both science and the nursing profession for high school students from diverse and disadvantaged backgrounds.
Results/Findings: Preliminary educational program progress and results will be presented for each of the three programs. The three programs are individual educational research studies that have been funded by the HRSA division of the nursing government.
Conclusions/Recommendations: Preliminary conclusions and recommendations based upon the progress of the three programs will be presented to the participants. Recommendations for other educators will be presented to help foster similar programs with the overarching goal to increase inclusion of diverse students both into applying and being accepted into nursing schools, as well as increasing the multicultural heritage of nurses entering the profession.

Xiaoying Jiang

Chinese Nursing Journals Publishing House Co. Ltd., China

Title: Promotion of excellent academic platform and development of nursing sciences

Time : 15:40-16:00

Biography:

Xiaoying Jiang is one of Chinese Laureates of the 43rd Florence Nightingale Award. She is the deputy director of the Chinese Nursing Association, the director of the Fujian Nursing Association, the director of Chinese Nursing Journals Publishing House Co. Ltd., the deputy director of the National Association of Colleges of Nursing, former dean of Nursing School of Fujian Medical University. She has chaired more than 30 research projects of National Ministry of Education and provincial project, published more than 210 papers in the core journals of nursing, and won the prize of national and provincial scientific research achievements 26 times. She is deputy editor in chief of several nursing journals and member of editorial board of a dozen nursing journals in China.

Abstract:

Chinese Nursing Association is the only one national nurse academic organization in China. It is a member of International Council of Nurses (ICN). Its academic exchanges and cooperation in nursing areas with all Member States increase day by day. It plays an important role in the international and domestic nursing specialty. Chinese Nursing Journals Publishing House Co. Ltd. belongs to Chinese Nursing Association. It is the most authoritative publication institution in nursing area in China, and the periodicals published include Chinese Journal of Nursing, Chinese Journal of Nursing Education and International Journal of Nursing Sciences. International Journal of Nursing Sciences is an international English journal co-published by the Elsevier Publishing Group. These journals play a great role in the promotion of Chinese nursing research and development of Chinese nursing sciences. First, it propagates national health policy and health care reform direction and leads the development of nursing sciences. Secondly, it enhances public health service capacity and creates excellent academic journal, which has showed Chinese nursing scientific research strength and improved the international influence of nursing in China. Thirdly, it is an important medium for promoting interdisciplinary communication, nursing research and nursing science. It has attracted innovative nursing research exchanges worldwide and established an international academic exchange platform. Last but not least, it takes advantages of excellent academic platform to improve Chinese nurses’ academic status and professional image.

Break:
Coffee Break 16:00-16:20 @ Versailles Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Lucy Mays, is a member of the faculty at Morehead State University. She is the Coordinator of the Associate Degree Nursing Program, Morehead Campus where she enjoys teaching medical surgical related content. She is a family nurse practitioner who works in primary care with general and indigent populations. She is very active in promoting positive health outcomes in the community to help prevent end organ disease and comorbidities related to health behaviors.

Abstract:

Today’s health care system presents an ever increasing complexity that requires nurses to possess multiple skills including interprofessional collaboration skills, cost effectiveness, currency, informatics skills, technical skills, clinical reasoning skills and a need for life-long learning. Both the Institute of Medicine (2011) and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (2010) have called for radical transformation in the way nurses are educated. A particular challenge to nursing education is the need to bridge the gap between theory and clinical. Nursing education often clearly demarcates acquisition of theory knowledge in the classroom and clinical practice and does not effectively assist students with the application of theory knowledge to hands on patient care. This sharp separation of classroom and clinical teaching must be overcome. “Teaching for a sense of salience” dictates that nurse educators better assist students with this translation of theory to practice. This challenge in nursing education includes the need to not only improve the way students acquire theory based knowledge (signs, symptoms, pathophysiology), but to also effectively translate theory knowledge to the clinical area to provide effective hands on patient care in order to improve patient outcomes. Chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus are multidimensional and require nurses not only to possess theory knowledge but effective clinical skills as well. Strategies for increasing salience related to diabetes mellitus management in classroom and clinical settings includes evolving case studies, in class active learning strategies, simulation activities and strategies to promote teaching effectiveness of adjunct clinical instructors.

Speaker
Biography:

Theresa A. Mikhailov completed her M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School and her Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of Illinois Chicago. She is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Medical of Wisconsin and the Medical Director of its Pediatric Critical Care Nurse Practitioner Program and its Pediatric Critical Care Nutrition Program as well as the Administrative Director of its Pediatric Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner Program. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals. She has served as a Co-chair and Physician Liaison for the APN Sub-committee of the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Pediatric Section.

Abstract:

Effective care delivery in the pediatric tertiary care setting has become increasingly problematic over recent years due to changes in available providers. This is related to a shift in the focus of post-graduate medical education from tertiary to primary care and expanded duty hour restrictions for physicians in training which limits their availability to provide tertiary pediatric care. Furthermore, the sub-specialization of pediatric intensive care units has increased the need for critical care providers. The problem has been further compounded by inadequate numbers of trained acute care pediatric nurse practitioners (ACPNP) since until recently there were only a few programs available to train ACPNP providers in the United States. In an effort to address these issues, Marquette University College of Nursing partnered with the Medical College of Wisconsin and Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in 2009 to bring local pediatric nurses interested in pursuing advanced practice training, the opportunity to do so locally. These collaborative efforts have assisted in preparing ACPNP students develop roles in multiple acute care pediatric specialty areas such as in gastroenterology and critical care and to function as highly qualified providers in these areas. The Pediatric Critical Care Division at the Medical College of Wisconsin developed a unique Attending Physician/ACPNP staffing model to deliver direct care to critically ill children that serves as an example for other programs regionally and nationally. Furthermore, these models of care delivery and ACPNP training, education, and preparation could be replicated by other organizations nationally and internationally, when faced with similar issues.

Xiaomei Li

Xian Jiaotong University Health Science Center, China

Title: Comparison of critical thinking skills of baccalaureate nursing students

Time : 17:00-17:20

Biography:

Xiaomei Li has completed her Ph.D. in epidemiology In 2008. She got the master degree in Nursing Science from Chiang Mai University, Thailand in 1994 and got bachelor degree of Nursing Science from La Trobe University, Australia, with the support from WHO fellowship program. She is the dean of Faculty of Nursing, School of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, with the research focus on community care of HIV/AIDS patients, health education on public for control HIV/AIDS, sleep promotion, stress management, community health nursing, and psychosocial care. She is a member of Xi’an Jiaotong University Human Research Protection Review Committee, a member of National Medical Graduate Education Advisory Committee, China, and vise-president of Nursing Education subcommittee in Medical Education Steering Committee, Chinese Ministry of Education, the executive committee member of Chinese National Nursing Textbook Quality Control Council. She is an editorial committee members of International Chinese journal of Nursing, and Editorial Board Member of two International journals: Nursing Education in Practice, Nursing and Health Science.

Abstract:

A comparison of critical thinking skills of baccalaureate nursing students in north east, central and western China was conducted to measure and compare the critical thinking abilities of nursing students based on the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (EETDI). A convenient sampling method was used in each area with 300 participants totally. The baccalaureate nursing student’s critical thinking scores in the three areas were compared for disposition. The findings indicated that in the total as well as the majority of sub-scale areas of critical thinking held by the nursing students of these three areas showed an ambivalence disposition towards critical thinking (mean=277.75 S.D=23.18). The ANOVA indicated that there were statistically significant differences among these three area on the total score as well as six sub-score (P〈0.01~0.001)with students in the central area holding the highest score (mean=288.94, S.D=21.18). The Tukey’s HSD indicated that the total mean score was statistically higher for students in central area than those for students in north eastern and in western areas. (p<0.001). There was also a significance difference between students in the eastern and western area (p<0.01).

Speaker
Biography:

Saunders is an Associate Professor at the University of Detroit Mercy and coordinates the Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist program. She has 25 years experience as a RN and 10 years experience as a certified Clinical Nurse Specialist. She earned her Ph.D. in Nursing at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan in 2006. She has taught nursing for the past 15 years and specializes in on-line methodologies. Her expertise is in adult and gerontology nursing care. Dr. Saunders is well published in the area of family caregiving for heart failure patients.

Abstract:

Nurses have an intimate bond with patients and a strong motivation to meet patients’ needs. One way of reflecting on patients’ needs is the use of poetry to express feelings and perceptions of clinical events. Through poetic descriptions of clinical events, nursing students learn to express their inner feelings and thoughts about certain human conditions. The benefits of writing poetry have been expressed by both faculty and students alike. Students’ poems on clinical events often depict the dignity and respect they feel for patients and families who are suffering and provide a venue for students to express these feelings on care issues and opportunities for change. For example, one student’s poem described events from a past experience that was so troubling that it was the impetus for her to quit working in that particular setting. This poem depicted an event of a family’s wishes overriding that of the patient’s. This student expressed the pain she felt when the patient’s wishes were ignored. This poem was about making difficult decisions and deciding who has the right to do so which faculty can then use to educate and support students in their role as patient advocates. Yet, in another poem, a student revealed the benefits she witnessed of family being present during a patient’s cardiac resuscitation procedure. Overall, writing poetry can deepen the nursing students understanding of the realities faced by patients, families and nurses in health care and awaken ideas and plans to support, challenge or change current practices.

Speaker
Biography:

Todd LaDage has been a Registered Nurse for 17 years. He completed his Associates Degree of Nursing from Kaskaskia College and Bachelor’s Degree from University of Phoenix. He is currently at Millikin University and Decatur Memorial Hospital’s Nurse Anesthesia program pursuing his Master’s Degree of Nurse Anesthesia graduating December 2015. He volunteers in his community teaching Advanced Cardiac Life Support. His interest is Nursing Informatics being involved is many leadership positions teaching health information systems throughout his nursing career. Todd is married to his bride, Darla, and they have three children residing in Pekin, Illinois.

Abstract:

Billions of dollars have been offered through governmental legislation for healthcare providers to use Electronic Medical Records (EMR) to document patient care. Despite the incentives and upcoming penalties, anesthesia providers have been slow to adopt an EMR called Anesthesia Information Management Systems (AIMS). The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators of anesthesia provider documentation on AIMS. Ninety Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNA) in Illinois responded to an online survey. The recognized facilitators for AIMS include improvements to Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) adherence, record completion, and easy access to patient information. The barriers to AIMS adoption are significant and include workflow disruption and cost. CRNAs are in an ideal position to help AIMS vendors facilitate the creation of an AIMS system that can address the documentation requirements of patient care while making a user interface customizable and individualized toward the end user (the CRNA).

Golnaz Forough-Ameri

Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title: The value of a man, missing concept in nursing education

Time : 18:00-18:20

Speaker
Biography:

Golnaz Forough-Ameri has completed his MSc in nursing management at the age of 26 years from Tehran University School of Nursing and Midwifery. She was manager of education of basic science group/ manager of education department/ manager of postgraduate program and manager of health group. She is teaching several courses for B.S. and postgraduate students such as principals of management. Also she is the director of several postgraduate theses. She has published more than 17 papers in Iranian reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of Iranian Journal of Qualitative Research in Health Sciences.

Abstract:

Background and Objective: In the holy book of Quran, about the human value it is written “everyone rescues a person from the dead, is such that he vitalizes all of the people”. A question that most nursing students faced with it especially in the wards of intensive care, dialysis, transplantation of organs and so on, is what is the value of a human life that the special machines, medical costs and advanced facilities of these wards are spent to maintain it while many people, around the world, encounter with death every day. This question indicates a lack of attention to the value of human life in nursing education. The present study is going to investigate this concept in the professional sources of nursing education. Materials and Methods: This is a library research that the nursing textbooks (Brunner Suddarth`s, Black & Hawks and Phipps & Lucmann which are taught mainly in Iran) as well as nursing lesson plans has been reviewed to determine to how much the concept of human value in these sources and training courses are taken into consideration. Results: Review of the four nursing textbooks showed that it is not clearly referred to the concept of human value in them. Of course, in most of the chapters of these books unclearly mentioned to the human value. For example in the 17th chapter of the Brunner & Suddarth’s textbook of medical-surgical nursing with the title of “dying patient” is referred to this concept. Also, in the Black & Hawks textbook of medical-surgical nursing in the chapter of “principles of professional and psychosocial cares” is referred to the human value. While in the Phipps & Lucmann is referred too little to the concept of human value. Review of the courses showed that there is no course in nursing field which analyzes the concept of human value, just in the professional ethics is pointed to it. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that life value of a man has not been considered the same as anatomy, physiology and even microbiology in nursing education. In addition, there are not any courses in nursing curriculum that directly or indirectly express this concept. In these reasons, to define, explain and express of the value of patient life as a human based on the Nursing Royal College of the UK, nursing is using of clinical criteria for better care, improve, strengthen, maintain and regain patient health and tackle health problems to achieve a quality of life from their disease to death-seems to need. Because if the nursing students in education period at the nursing school are familiar with these concepts, it is certain that the nursing services will be provided a better insight and attitude in the future.

Break:
18:20-19:30 Cocktails sponsored by Journal of Nursing & Care @ Versailles Foyer